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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
guns could be concentrated and opened. Official Report of Colonel Crutchfield. Reports of Army of Northern Virginia, p. 525. The only batty; Staff following as they may; one and another too late (as Colonel Crutchfield, our Chief of Artillery), and captured in mid street; a few d here Providence took care of him in a most timely way. Our Colonel Crutchfield, detained amidst his captors in the village street, shall teve nothing to do but ride forward and take them. Yes! avouched Crutchfield's despairing thought, he has them! There are no train-guards, aorsemen formed in column and advanced up the street, leaving Colonel Crutchfield in silent despair. But near the head of that street they weame the column in headlong flight, with a tempest of dust. Said Crutchfield's thoughts to him: Did those cannons drop from the skies? Did that of Captain Carrington, of Albemarle, just arrived, which Colonel Crutchfield had found so partially equipped and so absolutely unskilled,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
to the artillery; and that when fought at all, it was put in only in inefficient driblets. I select two or three examples where the most important consequences were involved. On the morning of the 30th of June, 1862, General Jackson, leading four divisions in pursuit, struck the enemy's rear-guard at White Oak Swamp about 9.30 A. M., and decided to force the crossing with artillery. It was 1.45 P. M. before twenty-eight guns could be concentrated and opened. Official Report of Colonel Crutchfield. Reports of Army of Northern Virginia, p. 525. The only battery of the enemy in sight was at once driven off, but in a short while eighteen guns were opened in reply from behind a wood, and a brisk contest was maintained until dark, when the enemy withdrew, having kept Jackson's whole force out of the critical action fought by Longstreet and A. P. Hill late in the afternoon at Frazier's Farm. The superior ammunition and guns of the enemy made this contest about an equal one; but even
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
and his army; Staff following as they may; one and another too late (as Colonel Crutchfield, our Chief of Artillery), and captured in mid street; a few yet, more toovidence, and here Providence took care of him in a most timely way. Our Colonel Crutchfield, detained amidst his captors in the village street, shall tell how the iing! You have nothing to do but ride forward and take them. Yes! avouched Crutchfield's despairing thought, he has them! There are no train-guards, and those whis. So the horsemen formed in column and advanced up the street, leaving Colonel Crutchfield in silent despair. But near the head of that street they were met by a , and back came the column in headlong flight, with a tempest of dust. Said Crutchfield's thoughts to him: Did those cannons drop from the skies? Did the angels fiw battery, that of Captain Carrington, of Albemarle, just arrived, which Colonel Crutchfield had found so partially equipped and so absolutely unskilled, that he had