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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. Report of its Operations, April 3-6, 1865, when it was captured with Lee's Division at Sailor's Creek. This, printed from the original manuscript, was recently supplied by General G. W. Custis Lee, late President Washington and Lee University: Savannah, March 3, 1866. Major-General G. Wern Virginia. General: In compliance with your request that I would communicate in an official form such information as I may possess of the operations of Crutchfield's Brigade, from the evacuation of the lines on the north of the James river to the capture of the Division at Sailors' Creek, on the 6th April, 1865, I have theed by a subsequent careful examination of the ground. The division immediately formed line, faced to the rear, about one-third of the distance down the hill, Crutchfield's Brigade on the right. But before the line was formed, and while the greater part of the troops were yet moving to their position, the enemy opened fire with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
the left of the entire corps) was the naval battalion, under Commodore Tucker, then came my little command of some ninety muskets, then came the command of Colonel Crutchfield (who was killed not far from where I stood). My belief has always been that there was a considerable interval between Crutchfield's right and the next commaCrutchfield's right and the next command. I think the troops named above numbered not more than 600 muskets. Artillery opened. Soon after we took our position the artillery of the enemy opened upon us, but the range was too high and did no damage, except to the tree tops. After the artillery had ceased firing a line of skirmishers appeared on the crest of the os Creek. This letter is written from memory, and there may be mistakes. I would, therefore, be glad to hear from any of the survivors of Tucker's Battalion, Crutchfield's Command, or of my command (the Second Battalion). At some future day I propose to write a brief account of what became of me, from our surrender at Sailor's C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
Retreat from Richmond. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, May 2, 1897.] Colonel Crutchfield and the artillery Brigade. see ante, pp. 38-47. the report to General G. W. Custis Lee, of Major W. S. Basinger, on the operations of Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. interesting reminiscences. A forced March 'Mid Cold and rain. Fight at Sailor's Creek. Richmond, Va., April 27, 1897rmed what was known as the Artillery Brigade, which at that time was under the command of Colonel Crutchfield. If I have made any omissions I would be glad to have them supplied. The adjutant-gd most severely. One-third were either killed or wounded, more or less seriously. Gallant Crutchfield killed. Colonel Crutchfield was killed, and Adjutant Wilson shot through the leg, which haColonel Crutchfield was killed, and Adjutant Wilson shot through the leg, which had to be amputated. I received a slight wound in the shoulder, which, however, did not incapacitate me. After the enemy had retreated across the creek, we gathered up our handful of men and fell bac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
king degree, my recollections. These reports make special mention of the conspicuous part borne by the Artillery Brigade at Sailor's creek. I quote as follows: Major-General G. W. C. Lee, commanding the divisions, composed of Barton's and of Crutchfield's Artillery Brigade, says: Before my troops got into position across the creek the enemy opened a heavy fire of artillery upon our line, which was continued up to the time of our capture. After shelling our lines and skirmishing for sohly praise the conduct of my command, and hope to have the opportunity of doing it full justice when reports are received from the brigade commanders. Among a number of brave men killed or wounded, I regret to have to announce the name of Colonel Crutchfield, who commanded the Artillery Brigade. He was killed after gallantly leading a successful charge against the enemy. Lieutenant-General Ewell, commanding the corps (Kershaw's and G. W. C. Lee's divisions), says that the Artillery Brigad
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
bert, 139. Cleery, Major F. D 5. Cobb, Gen. T. R. R., Legion of, 147. Coinage Debate in 1852, 200. Cold Harbor, Battle of, 160, 171, 209, 234. Colston, Gen. R. E., Tribute to, 346; Ode by, 352. Confederate Cause, The, 21, 357. Confederate Dead, The, Poem by A. C. Gordon, 382. Confederate Forces, Total of, 308. Confederate Navy, The Shenandoah, 116; Alabama, Florida, 126. Council, Col J. C., 12. Cowardin, Lieut. John L., 139. Crater, Charge at the, 285. Crutchfield's Artillery Brigade; Operations of April, 1865, 38, 139, 285. Cumberland Grays, 21st Va. Infantry, Roster and Record of, 264. Custer, Gen., Geo. A., 239. Danville, Explosion at, April, 1865, 271. Davis, Pres't, Jefferson, 69; at Manassas, 94. Davis, Sam, A Southern Hero, Tribute to by Ella Wheeler Wilcox, 231. Deloney, Col. W. G., 147. Drewry's Bluff, Battle of, 206. Duke, Col. R. T. W., 138. Duncan, Col. R. P., 17. Early, Gen. Jubal A., 109, 153. Early, Capt. W