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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 4 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Culp or search for Culp in all documents.

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ed moving. As soon as Hood's intentions were fully developed, the general movement northward commenced. Pursuant to Special Field Orders No. 83, from General Sherman, the army of the Tennessee moved, October fourth, from East-Point to Smyrna camp-ground, making a toilsome march of twenty-one miles over a bad road. The Fifteenth corps was commanded by Major-General P. Joseph Osterhaus, and the Seventeenth by Brigadier-General T. E. G. Ransom. The fifth of October, the army moved to Culp's farm, which was the prolongation of the works of Kenesaw Mountain. On the fourth, it was well ascertained that Hood's entire army, excepting Wheeler's cavalry, had moved up abreast of Marietta, struck the railroad between that place and Allatoona, and, with a part of his force at least, was moving on Allatoona. General Sherman signalled from Kenesaw, the telegraph wires having been cut by the enemy, for General Corse to move to Allatoona at once with his whole command. General Corse re