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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
ally inadequate on a former occasion. Charleston harbor, in its general configuration, may be likened to that of New York, the city being on a neck of land somewhat resembling Manhattan Island; Cooper River, on the east, may be compared to the East River; while the Ashley River, on the west, resembles the Hudson. Morris and Sullivan Islands may pass for the defensive points at the Narrows, though the channel between them is much wider; and the interior fortifications — Sumter, Moultrie, Cumming's Point, Battery Gregg, Fort Johnson, etc.--were all within the lines of Morris and Sullivan Islands. An attack on Fort Wagner could be made by a naval force without bringing the ships composing it within range of the heavy batteries which successfully resisted the attack of the Monitors on the first occasion. The plan of General Gillmore was to dispossess the enemy of Morris Island by opening batteries placed on the north end of Folly Island, to command those of the enemy on Morris Isl
eines, cables, &c., attached to torpedoes below — all contrived, if the torpedoes failed to destroy any vessel which might attempt to break the hawser, at least to foul her propeller and deprive her crew of all command over her movements, leaving her to drift helpless and useless where a few hours at most must insure her demolition. Capt. Rodgers did not choose to squander his vessel so recklessly; and, after a brief hesitation, attempted to pass westward of Fort Sumter, between that and Cumming's Point: but this channel was found obstructed by a row of great piles, driven far into the earth and rising ten feet above the surface of the water; with another row stretching across its entire width a mile or so farther up the harbor; with still another behind this, backed by three Rebel iron-clads, all smoking and roaring in concert with the forts and batteries on every side. And now, as if our embarrassments were too trivial, the Ironsides is caught by the tide and veered off her cour
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
upted by his adversary. When McPherson, with two divisions, had come up, and McClernand with four, including Blair's of Sherman's corps, was within an hour's march of the field, the action was begun by Hovey's division, which assailed the left and centre of Stevenson's. Logan's division, moving by the right of Hovey's, passed the left of Stevenson's line as if to take it in reverse. Stevenson transferred Barton's brigade from his right to the left rear to meet this movement, while with Cumming's and Lee's he opposed Hovey's attack. This opposition was so effective that General Hovey called for aid, and McPherson's other division, Quimby's, was sent to his assistance. In the mean time Logan had engaged Barton, and Stevenson's three brigades were forced back by the three Federal divisions; and at two o'clock they had lost the ground on which they had just stood, many men, and much of their artillery. Lieutenant-General Pemberton restored the fight by bringing Bowen's division,
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
at the Seventeenth Corps had broken through the mere skirmish-line of his left, and was pressing rapidly toward Bentonville, in rear of our centre and on the only route of retreat. Lieutenant-General Hardee was directed to unite the troops then marching to the left, and to oppose this movement with them. But the rapid march of the leading Federal troops, Mower's division, left no time for this union. Fortunately, Lieut.-Gen. Hampton, while leading a cavalry reserve to meet the enemy, saw Cumming's Georgia brigade, commanded by Colonel Henderson, on its way to the left, and directed it toward Bentonvilie. It reached the point in the road toward which the enemy was marching just as he appeared. Lieut.-Gen. Hardee galloped up at the same time, followed by the Eighth Texas cavalry regiment which he had found on the way. He instantly directed Henderson to charge the enemy in front, and the Texans their left flank; Lieut.-Gen. Hampton coming up on the other side with Young's brigade, c
shall never die! Shot and shell expended during the bombardment of Fort Sumter.--From the statistical report of the batteries engaged during the bombardment of Fort Sumter, published in yesterday's Mercury, we compile the following, which will prove interesting to many readers. The number of shot and shell thrown by each battery is here given, making a grand total of 2,361 shot and 980 shell.  shot.shell. Stevens' Battery, Morris Island18360 Trapier's Battery, Morris Island--170 Cumming's Point Battery, Morris Island336197 Rifle Cannon, Morris Island1119 Battery No. 1, Sullivan's Island--185 Battery No. 2, (Mortar,) Sullivan's Island--88 Sumter Battery, Sullivan's Island6511 Oblique Battery, Sullivan's Island1105 Enfilade Battery, Sullivan's Island600-- Dahlgren Battery, Sullivan's Island--61 Floating Battery, Sullivan's Island470-- Mount Vleasant Battery--51 Lower Battery, James Island--90 Upper Battery, James Island--53    2,361980 --Charleston Mercury, May
s, eight monitors, and a large number of other vessels were in sight, the Ironsides having already crossed the bar and come to anchor off Morris Island. An infantry force, variously estimated at from three thousand to six thousand, was landed on Coles's Island, off the mouth of Stono River, during Sunday night. But before proceeding further, it may be well to restate the names of the torts and batteries that participated in the fight. They are Fort Sumter in the harbor, Fort Wagner and Cumming's Point Battery on Morris Island, the first looking seaward, and the second across the harbor; and Fort Moultrie, Battery Bee, and Battery Beau-regard, on Sullivan's Island. Looking out to sea from Charleston, Morris Island is on the extreme right, and Sullivan's Island on the extreme left. After various changes of position, the whole iron-clad fleet advanced to the attack at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon, the seventh, in the following order: The first line consisted of four monitors, t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Carter L. Stevenson of the Tennessee campaign. (search)
reports of the scouts to be correct, and occupied the town without opposition. I then moved forward my division, except Cumming's brigade (commanded on the campaign by Colonel E. P. Watkins, Fifty-sixth Georgia), which, by General Lee's order, was yton's line and upon Pettus' brigade of my division — exposing, in their assault upon Pettus, their flank to a fire from Cumming's brigade. Their success the previous day had emboldened them, and they rushed forward with great spirit, only to be drers from General Lee to leave Pettus' brigade at Hollow Tree Gap, to assist in bringing up the rear, and to proceed with Cumming's brigade and bivouac near the battle-field at Franklin, leaving guards upon the road to stop the stragglers of the army. The next morning, by General Lee's order, I returned with Cumming's brigade to Franklin, and was there joined by General Pettus with his brigade, which had that morning before reaching Franklin captured a stand of colors. Soon after crossing the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General C. L. Stevenson from the beginning of the Dalton-Atlanta campaign to May 30, 1864. (search)
eft, General Reynolds on the left-centre, General Cumming on the right-centre, and General Brown on's brigade on the mountain, and Reynold's and Cumming's in the valley. Soon after the assault upon time disposed to assault the position of Generals Cumming and Reynolds. In front of General Cumminurpose, moved two regiments across the road. Cumming and Brown were in my front line, Pettus beingositions which entirely enfiladed portions of Cumming's line. The men were sheltered as well as poich were advanced in front of the line of General Cumming, was particularly destructive, and amongsts of the ridge some distance in front of General Cumming. Brown and his support (Reynolds) were d the left. After the movement commended, General Cumming was also directed to wheel all of his briion of my force which was on the right of General Cumming, out of the trenches, and, co-operating wed.Wounded.Missing. Brown's brigade,3917310 Cumming's brigade,1989270 Reynold's brigade,33126190[3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations about Lookout mountain. (search)
m's division, was removed from the Craven house slope, and Cumming's brigade, of my own division, from the top of the mountain--General Cumming, as senior officer present, being placed in command of the two brigades. I was advised by Lieutenant-Gene means at my disposal permitted, either for an attack upon Cumming or Jackson. Immediately upon my arrival on the mountain considerable force upon the Chattanooga road, in front of Cumming's line, evidently for the purpose of co-operating with andthe view was obscured by the mist, the serious weakness of Cumming's force, there not being a man for yards upon some parts oy that to reinforce the command near the Craven house from Cumming was to give the enemy an opportunity to cut us off from th once to cross Chattanooga creek (about 11 o'clock P. M.), Cumming at 1 o'clock, and Cheatham's division afterwards, all withff officers of General Bragg's rode up to where I was (General Cumming's quarters), and stating that they could not find Gene
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Frank H. Harleston — a hero of Fort Sumter. (search)
t on the memorable occasion when the Star of the West was fired upon and driven back. When the Cadets were relieved from duty on Morris Island, he returned to the city and was soon afterwards appointed First Lieutenant in the First Regiment South Carolina Regular Artillery, then a battalion, and assigned to duty at Fort Moultrie, where he remained during the months of preparation which preceeded the reduction of Fort Sumter. Just before the attack he was transferred to the Iron battery at Cumming s Point, where his efficiency and skill were conspicuous during the bombardment. On the occupation of Fort Sumter April 13th, 1861, by our forces, he returned to Fort Moultrie and was soon afterwards made Adjutant of the Battalion of Regular Artillery. In January, 1862, he was promoted to a Captaincy in his regiment, and assigned to the command of Company D, then stationed in Fort Sumter. He assisted General Ripley very materially in the organization of that splendid corps of artilleri
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