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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 9 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 63 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 2 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 7 1 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 6 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 2 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, V. In the dust and ashes of defeat (may 6-June 1, 1865). (search)
trodden underfoot . . . but immortal hate and study of revenge lives, in the soul of every man. . . . [Ms. torn.] Mrs. Alfred Cumming, whose husband was Governor of Utah before the war, came to see us this morning. She tried to go to Clarkesville,perate. The poor are clamoring for bread, and many of them have taken to bushwhacking as their only means of living. Mrs. Cumming traveled from Union Point to Barnett in the same car with Mr. Stephens. The Yankee guard suffered him to stop an hourand wringing their hands. All his negroes went out to see him off, and many others from the surrounding plantations. Mrs. Cumming says that as the train moved off, all along the platform, honest black hands of every shape and size were thrust in atse than to the merits of our housekeeping; our larder is about down to a starvation basis . . Capt. Hudson and Mrs. Alfred Cumming called after breakfast, and while we were in the parlor with them, a servant came in bringing a present of a pet l
rders and other outrages were the consequence; and the hatred and fury against the Gentiles, engendered in these heated imaginations, had much to do with the resistance to the United States Government, and the acts of open hostility in 1857. After the inauguration of Mr. Buchanan, he determined to put an end to the conflict of authority in Utah by the removal from office of Brigham Young, and the appointment of an entire body of Federal officers in no wise affiliated with Mormonism. Alfred Cumming, of Georgia, was made Governor; D. R. Eckles, Chief-Justice; John Cradlebaugh and Charles E. Sinclair, Associate Justices; John Hartnett, Secretary; and Peter K. Dotson, Marshal. A detachment of the army, under Brigadier-General Harney, was ordered to accompany the Federal appointees, to protect them from the violence shown their predecessors, and to act as a posse comitatus in the execution of the laws. Brigham is said to have received this news on the 24th of July, 1857, when cele
ticism on General Johnston. trouble with Governor Cumming. an icy Spring. peace commissioners. sntly became matter of controversy between Governor Cumming and himself: Headquarters of the army, Jhis cavalry were assigned as an escort to Governor Cumming and the civil officers of Utah; but Genern executing the decrees of the court. Governor Cumming was a guest in his camp, and dependent foty and bearing in all matters as to force Governor Cumming and every one else to respect him and his outside, overheard the remark, and fired Governor Cumming's heart. The Governor chose to construe ere he chose. General Porter says: Governor Cumming was placed in his chair, and became GoverColonel Kane had in some manner satisfied Governor Cumming that not only would he be personally welcdvance of the army into Salt Lake Valley. Governor Cumming left camp on the 5th of April, and arrive As the army approached Salt Lake City, Governor Cumming wrote to General Johnston, June 17th: [9 more...]
an affairs. Mormon Slanders. issue with Governor Cumming. conflicts of authority. Governor's proion a powerful engine against opponents. Governor Cumming's first communication from Salt Lake City issue arose between General Johnston and Governor Cumming, in which the latter was evidently misledustice. At this juncture, March 20th, Governor Cumming appeared upon the scene, and requested Gebranch of the Territorial government. Governor Cumming issued the following proclamation, denounerritory in an entirely false light: By Alfred Cumming, Governor of Utah Territory: a proclamatiomentioned troops: Now, therefore, I, Alfred Cumming, Governor of the Territory of Utah, do herof the United States the eighty-third. Alfred Cumming. By the Governor: (Signed) John Hatary of State. With whatever accuracy Governor Cumming may have interpreted his instructions frof the laissez-faire course represented by Governor Cumming. So he let things drift. Though the [2 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 15: the Maryland campaign. (search)
k's Ford under the severe fire of the enemy's batteries, and marched on up the left bank as far as the Point of Rocks, where he crossed and rested on the 11th. On the 12th he marched to and bivouacked at Hillsboroa; on the 13th, to the foot of the Blue Ridge and occupied Loudoun Heights by a detachment under Colonel Cooke. Not satisfied with the organization of McLaws's column, I asked and obtained permission on the 10th to strengthen it by three other brigades,--Wilcox's, under Colonel Alfred Cumming; Featherston's, and Pryor's, which were attached to R. H. Anderson's division. The different columns from Frederick marched as ordered, except in the change authorized for Anderson's division. It was a rollicking march, the Confederates playing and singing, as they marched through the streets of Frederick, The girl I left behind me. Jackson recrossed the Potomac on the 11th, at Light's Ford, ordered A. P. Hill's division by the turnpike to Martinsburg, his own and Ewell's nor
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Maj. J. C. Campbell and Lieut.-Col. William H. Luse; 21st Miss., Capt. John Sims and Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys. Artillery, Maj. S. P. Hamilton, Col. H. C. Cabell; Manly's (N. C.) battery, Capt. B. C. Manly; Pulaski (Ga.) Art., Capt. J. P. W. Read; Richmond (Fayette) Art., Capt. M. C. Macon; Richmond Howitzers (1st Co.), Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Troup (Ga.) Art., Capt. H. H. Carlton. Anderson's Division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson:--Wilcox's Brigade, Col. Alfred Cumming; 8th, 9th, 10th, and 11th Ala. Mahone's Brigade, Col. William A. Parham; 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Va. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Featherston, Col. Carnot Posey; 12th Miss., 16th Miss., Capt. A. M. Feltus; 19th Miss., 2d Miss. Battn. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead, Col. J. G. Hodges; 9th, 14th, 38th, 53d, and 57th Va. Pryor's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor; 14th Ala., 2d and 8th Fla., 3d Va. Right's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright; 4
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 35: cut off from East and West. (search)
al Kershaw attacked and pushed the enemy back from his front at the Gap before he could get out of it. Honorable mention is also due General Jenkins for his equally clever pursuit of the enemy at Lenoir's Station; Brigadier-General Humphreys and Bryan for their conduct at the storming assault; Colonel Ruff, who led Wofford's brigade, and died in the ditch; Colonel McElroy, of the Thirteenth Mississippi Regiment, and Colonel Thomas, of the Sixteenth Georgia, who also died in the ditch; Lieutenant Cumming, adjutant of the Sixteenth Georgia Regiment, who overcame all obstacles, crowned the parapet with ten or a dozen men, and, entering the fort through one of the embrasures, was taken prisoner; and Colonel Fiser, of the Eighteenth Mississippi, who lost an arm while on the parapet. Not the least of the gallant acts of the campaign was the dash of Captain Winthrop, who led our once halting lines over the rail defences at Knoxville. The transfer of the army to the east bank of the rive
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
6, 126, 180, 211,219, 306 Conestoga horses, 200 Confederate enlisted men, tributes to, 19, 48-58, 358-68. Confederate Infantry: Naval Battalion, 329, 333 Confederate Museum, 357 Congressional Globe, 29 Conkling, Roscoe, 62 Connecticut Infantry; 27th Regiment, 174-75. Couch, Darius Nash, 165 Courts-martial, 351 Cowardice, 135, 274, 276-77. Crouch, Frederick William Nicholls, 49, 296 Crowninshield, Casper, 62 Culpeper Court House, Va., 73, 127, 192 Cumming, Alfred, 113 Currency, 63, 87-88. Custer, George Armstrong, 237 Dahlgren Raid, 236-37. Dame, William Meade, 240-44, 252- 53, 288-89. Daniel, John Warwick, 214 Davis, Henry Winter, 27 Davis, James Lucius, 82 Davis, Jefferson: and Lee, 17-18, 208, 312; mentioned, 26 Denman, Buck, 69-70, 130-31. Desertion, Confederate, 312-13, 323- 26, 349-51. Dixie, 202 Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 26 Drewry's Bluff, Va., 311, 322 Dunn House, Va., 310 Duty is the sublimest word ..
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
orge O. Dawson; 9th Ga., Col. R. A. Turnipseed; 11th Ga., Lieut.-Col. William Luffman. Brigade loss: k, 64; w, 327; m, 46 = 437. Artillery, Maj. John J. Garnett: Va. Battery (Wise Arty.), Capt. James S. Brown; S. C. Battery (Washington Arty.), Capt. James F. Hart; La. Battery (Madison Arty.), Capt. George V. Moody; Va. Battery, Capt. W. J. Dabney. Artillery loss; k, 3; w, 11==14. McLaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Paul J. Semmes: 10th Ga., Col. Alfred Cumming (w), Capt. W. C. Holt; 53d Ga., Col. L. T. Doyal; 5th La., Col. T. G. Hunt; 10th La., Lieut.-Col. Eugene Waggaman (w and c); 15th Va., Col. T. P. August (w); 32d Va., Lieut.-Col. William R. Willis; N. C. Battery, Capt. Basil C. Manly. Brigade loss: k, 31; w, 121; m, 63==215. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy, Maj. F. Gaillard; 3d S. C., Colonel James D. Nance; 7th S. C., Col. D. Wyatt Aiken; 8th S. C., Col. John W. Henagan; Va. Battery (Alex
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
Cabell: N. C. Battery, Capt. Basil C. Manly; Ga. Battery (Pulaski Art'y), Capt. John P. W. Read; Va. Battery (Richmond Fayette Art'y), Capt. M. C. Macon; Va. Battery (1st Co. Richmond Howitzers), Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Ga. Battery (Troup Art'y), Capt. H. H. Carlton. (Loss of the artillery included with that of the brigades to which attached.) Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (w), Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor. Staff loss (in the campaign): w, 1. Wilcox's Brigade, Col. Alfred Cumming: 8th Ala.----; 9th Ala.,----; 10th Ala.,----; 11th Ala.,----. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 34; w, 181; m, 29 = 244. Mahone's Brigade, Col. W. A. Parham: 6th Va.,----; 12th Va.,----; 16th Va.,----; 41st Va.,----; 61st Va.,----. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 8; w, 92; m, 127 = 227. Featherston's Brigade, Col. Carnot Posey: 12th Miss.,----; 16th Miss., Capt. A. M. Feltus; 19th Miss.,----; 2d Miss. Battalion,----. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 45; w, 238: m, 36 = 319. Armi
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