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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for J. F. Cumming or search for J. F. Cumming in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
the 1st South Carolina Infantry (regulars) and six guns: five 10-inch and one 8-inch Columbiads. 4. Battery Beauregard, under Captain Julius A. Sitgreaves, with two companies of regulars--one from Sumter and one from Moultrie — and three guns: an 8-inch Columbiad and two 32-pounders, rifled. 5. Battery Wagner, under Major C. K. Huger, with two companies of regulars from Sumter. There four guns were used: one 32-pbunder, rifled; one 24-pounder, rifled; and two smooth-bore 32-pounders. 6. Cumming's Point Battery, under Lieutenant Henry R. Lesesne, with a detachment of regulars from Fort Sumter. Two guns were engaged: one 10-inch Columbiad and one 8-inch Dahlgren. The number of guns actually engaged on our side against the iron-clad fleet, on the 7th of April, was therefore 69, of which five were mortars. Two companies of infantry had been placed on Sullivan's and Morris islands, to guard against a land attack. Commodore Ingraham had also been cautioned to hold the gun-boats Pal
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.9 (search)
ains about four hundred acres of sand dunes and salt marshes; the portion of the island lying toward James Island being formed almost entirely of very soft morasses, and traversed by deep bayous and crooked creeks in every direction. The Union troops under Major-General Quincy A. Gillmore, the Tenth Army Corps, in the early morning of July 10th, 1863, crossed Light-house Inlet from Folly Island and captured a large portion of Morris Island. [See p. 58.] The Confederate forces still held Cumming's Point Battery and Battery Wagner on that part of Morris Island nearest to Fort Sumter and to Charleston. On the 13th day of July, 1863, General Gillmore directed Lieu tenant Peter S. Michie, United States Corps of Engineers,--now Colonel Michie, a professor in the Military Academy at West Point,--to make an examination of the marshes on the left of our position toward Charleston and ascertain if it were possible to construct a battery from which to fire into that city. In compliance wit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
urg (Va.) Art'y, Capt. C. T. Allen; Pamunkey (Va.) Art'y, Capt. A. J. Jones. Drewry's Bluff, Maj. F. W. Smith. Johnston (Va.) Art'y, Capt. Branch J. Epes; Neblett (Va.) Art'y, Capt. W. G. Coleman; Southside (Va.) Art'y, Capt. J. W. Drewry; United (Va.) Art'y, Capt. Thomas Kevill. Chaffin's Farm, Maj. A. W. Stark. Matthews's (Va.) Art'y, Capt. A. D. Armistead; McComas's (Va.) Art'y, Capt. D. A. French. artillery, Col. H. P. Jones. Moseley's Battalion, Lieut.-Col. E. F. Moseley: Cumming's (N. C.) Battery; Miller's (N. C.) Battery; Slaten's (Ga.) Battery; Young's (Va.) Battery. Coit's Battalion, Maj. J. C. Coit: Bradford's (Miss.) Battery; Kelly's (S. C.) Battery; Pegram's (Va.) Battery; Wright's (Va.) Battery. Unassigned: Sturdivant's (Va.) Battery. Lee's effective force at the commencement of the campaign was not less than 61,000, and Beauregard's command about Richmond and Petersburg, including the troops sent from North Carolina and South Carolina up to May 15th, a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
orks. General Hardee transmitted to me no official report at that period, nor subsequently, of his operations whilst under my command. I find, however, from the diary in my possession that his corps succeeded in gaining a portion of the Federal works; the general attack, notwithstanding, must have been rather feeble, as the loss incurred was only about 1400 in killed and wounded — a small number in comparison to the forces engaged. Among the wounded were General Patton Anderson and General Cumming, who were disabled whilst gallantly leading their troops into action. This failure gave to the Federal army the control of the Macon road, and thus necessitated the evacuation of Atlanta at the earliest hour possible. I was not so much pained by the fall of Atlanta as by the recurrence of retreat, which I full well knew would further demoralize the army and renew desertions. The loss of over 4000, sustained from this same cause during the change from Kenesaw Mountain to and acros
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
of December. This is the communication referred to in the letter of Governor Harris, above quoted. This note was read, so far as I know, by only four persons besides myself — my chief-of-staff, James D. Porter, Governor Isham G. Harris, Major J. F. Cumming, of Georgia, and John C. Burch. Not having been in the habit of carrying a certificate of military character, I attached no special value to the paper, and it was lost somewhere during the campaign in North Carolina. Governor Porter and MMajor Cumming agree with me that the following was the substance of the note: December 3d, 1864. my dear General: I do not censure you for the failure at Spring Hill. I am satisfied you are not responsible for it. I witnessed the splendid manner in which you delivered battle at Franklin on the 30th ult. I now have a higher estimate of you as a soldier than I ever had. You can rely upon my friendship. Yours very truly, J. B. Hood, General. To General B. F. Cheatham. On the morning
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
Bell; 41st Miss., Capt. J. M. Hicks. Brantly's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. F. Brantly: 24th and 34th Miss., Capt. C. Dancy; 27th Miss., Capt. S. M. Pegg; 29th and 30th Miss., Capt. R. W. Williamson; Dismounted Cavalry, Capt. D. W. Alexander. artillery, Lieut.-Col. L. Hoxton (Chief, Corps Art'y). Courtney's Battalion, Capt. J. P. Douglas: Ala. Battery, Capt. S. H. Dent; Ala. Battery, Lieut. H. Ferrell; Tex. Battery, Lieut. Ben. Hardin. Stevenson's division, Maj.-Gen. C. L. Stevenson. Cumming's Brigade, Col. E. P. Watkins: 34th Ga., Capt. R. A. Jones; 36th Ga., Col. Charles E. Broyles; 39th Ga., Capt. W. P. Milton; 56th Ga., Capt. B. T. Spearman. Pettus's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. W. Pettus: 20th Ala., Col. J. N. Dedman; 23d Ala., Lieut.-Col. J. B. Bibb; 30th Ala., Lieut.-Col. J. R. Elliott; 31st Ala., Lieut.-Col. T. M. Arrington; 46th Ala., Capt. G. E. Brewer. Artillery Battalion (Johnston's), Capt. J. B. Rowan: Ga. Bat'y, Lieut. W. S. Hoge; Ga. Bat'y, Lieut. W. L. Ritter. Clay
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of Bentonville. (search)
d were then very near the main road leading to the bridge. This attack rendered our position extremely dangerous, for if the attacking force had been able to attain possession of the road we could not have withdrawn without very heavy loss, if we could have done so at all. Just before the courier who brought me the information of the advance of the army met me, I had passed a brigade, whose numbers were not more than sufficient to constitute a regiment, moving toward our left. This was Cumming's Georgia brigade, commanded then, I think, by Colonel Henderson, and I doubt if there were more than 200 to 250 in the command. Realizing the importance of prompt action, I ordered this command to move at once to the point threatened, and also ordered up a battery which I had passed. I then sent a courier to bring up all the mounted men he could find, and in a few minutes a portion of the 8th Texas Cavalry--sixty or eighty men-responded to my call. All of these troops were hurried up to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
n. Young M. Moody: 41st Ala., Col. Martin L. Stansel; 43d Ala., Maj. William J. Mims; 59th Ala., Maj. Lewis H. Crumpler; 60th Ala., Col. John W. A. Sanford; 23d Ala. Batt'n, Maj. N. Stallworth. Ranson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Matthew W. Ransom: 24th N. C.,----; 25th N. C., Col. Henry M. Rutledge; 35th N. C., Maj. R. E. Petty; 49th N. C., Maj. Charles Q. Petty; 56th N. C., Col. Paul F. Faison. artillery, Col. H. P. Jones. Blount's Battalion: Ga. Battery, Capt. C. W. Slaten; N. C. Battery (Cumming's), Lieut. Alexander D. Brown; Va. Battery (Miller's),----; Va. Battery (Young's),----. Coit's Battalion: Miss. Battery (Bradford's),----; Va. Battery (R. G. Pegram's),----; Va. Battery (Wright's),----. Stribling's Battalion: Va. Battery (Dickerson's),----; Va. Battery (Marshall's), Lieut. T. Marshall; Va. Battery (Macon's),----; Va. Battery (Sullivan's), Lieut. William S. Archer. Smith's Battalion, Capt. William F. Dement: 1st Md. Battery, Lieut. John Gale; Va. Battery (Johnston's), Lieut.