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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for S. W. Cunningham or search for S. W. Cunningham in all documents.

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h, first sponger and loader, killed; Flanagan, first sponger, killed; M. Kennedy, first shotman; Haney, first assistant sponger; Gorman, first train tackle man; Cunningham, first train tackle-man; Acaney, second train tackle-man; Thomas Gallaway, first handspike man; John Farrell, second handspike man; McKenny, powder-man; Cook, Fys, who had so lately suffered at Iuka, to remember their duty, and, although severely wounded, remained with his regiment until it marched off the field. Majors Cunningham, of the Fifteenth, and Purcell, of the Sixteenth, did their whole duty and conducted themselves with great bravery. Two companies of the Thirteenth Iowa, cor, by his coolness and daring exercised an almost singular control over his men. He fell mortally wounded, dying the death of a patriot and brave man. Second Lieut. S. W. Cunningham, same company, behaved bravely and well. He was severely wounded in the face. Captain Otis W. Pollock, Acting Adjutant, rendered effective and gal
t the time watching the splendid firing of the piece. God deliver me from ever again witnessing such a painful sight as those mangled and disfigured bodies presented. One lived for several moments, but died as we were lifting him into an ambulance. The men who were manning the gun at the time of the accident were as follows: Gough, first sponger and loader, killed; Flanagan, first sponger, killed; M. Kennedy, first shotman; Haney, first assistant sponger; Gorman, first train tackle man; Cunningham, first train tackle-man; Acaney, second train tackle-man; Thomas Gallaway, first handspike man; John Farrell, second handspike man; McKenny, powder-man; Cook, First Captain; Griffin, Second Captain; Captain McGrath, who stood by directing the fire, was thrown to the ground, and at first supposed to be killed. He soon recovered. While several members of company K, First Maryland, were taking breakfast, after the first repulse of the enemy, five different balls struck the table. W. Heni
along the line of his regiment amid the storm of bullets, encouraging his brave boys, who had so lately suffered at Iuka, to remember their duty, and, although severely wounded, remained with his regiment until it marched off the field. Majors Cunningham, of the Fifteenth, and Purcell, of the Sixteenth, did their whole duty and conducted themselves with great bravery. Two companies of the Thirteenth Iowa, company A, in command of Capt. Kennedy, and company G, in command of Capt. Walker, ha Capt. James McFadden, company K, just promoted, an earnest and intelligent officer, by his coolness and daring exercised an almost singular control over his men. He fell mortally wounded, dying the death of a patriot and brave man. Second Lieut. S. W. Cunningham, same company, behaved bravely and well. He was severely wounded in the face. Captain Otis W. Pollock, Acting Adjutant, rendered effective and gallant service during the day. Assistant-Surgeon A. B. Monahan, acting surgeon, was