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rigade, under Colonel A. Fearing, and composed of the One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York, Colonel Currie<*> and the One Hundred and Seventy-third New-York, Major Galway, the rest of this brigade bet part of the struggle, it is only fair to say that Colonel Kimball, of the Fifty-third, and Colonel Currie<*> of the One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York, advanced most gallantly with their men to rtained that the enemy had no artillery bearing on this point. At the head of the column was Colonel Currie, with the One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York regiment, as fine a body of soldiers as are and the column, which should have been but two hundred yards behind, was not visible, except Col. Currie, with a part of his regiment in good order. Then Lieut. Jewett, of the Fourth Wisconsin, onegiments, there was nobody to go in, and this brave band of heroes were murdered; so that when Col. Currie came up in a few minutes, the work was bristling again with bayonets and belching lead like h
ports of ships destined for the use of belligerents; and your memorialists would further suggest to your Lordship the importance of endeavoring to secure the assent of the Government of the United States of America, and of other foreign countries, to the adoption of similar regulations in those countries also. All which your memorialists respectfully submit. Signed, Thomas Chilton, Jones, Palmer & Co., Farnworth & Jardine, Thos. & Jas. Harrison, L. H. Macintyre, Potter brothers, Chas. Geo. Cowre & Co., M. J. Sealby, R. Gervin & Co., J. Aikin, Finlay, Campbell & Co., Cropper, Ferguson & Co., J. Campbell, S. R. Graves, Rankin, Gilmore & Co., Rathbone Bros. & Co., James Brown & Co., Liverpool, June 9, 1863. James Poole & Co., W. T. Jacob, Henry Moore & Co., Imrie & Tomlinson, Sampson & Holt, James Barnes, Richard Nicholson & son, W. B. Boadle, J. Prowse & Co., Currie, Newton & Co., Nelson, Alexander & Co., Kendall brothers, C. T. Bowrin & Co., G. H. Fletcher & Co., Alfred Holt.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
tant. Colonel Dwight, acting-assistant inspector-general. Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Kinsey, 161st New York volunteers. Lieutenant-Colonel Hubbard, 30th Maine volunteers. Major Sawtelle, provost marshal, and Lieutenant Williamson,.ordnance officer. The following were a portion of the regiments employed: 29th Maine, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Emerson; 116th New York, commanded by Colonel George M. Love; 161st New York, commanded by Captain Prentiss; 133d New York, commanded by Colonel Currie. The engineer regiment and officers of the 13th army corps were also employed. I feel that I have done but feeble justice to the work or the persons engaged in it. Being severely indisposed, I feel myself unable to go into further details. I trust some future historian will treat this matter as it deserves to be treated, because it is a subject in which the whole country should feel an interest, and the noble men who succeeded so admirably in this arduous task should not lose one
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
dred and Sixty-first New-York volunteers. Lieutenant-Colonel Hubbard, Thirtieth Maine volunteers. Major Sawtelle, Provost-Marshal, and Lieutenant Williamson, Ordnance Officer. The following were a portion of the regiments employed: Twenty-ninth Maine, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Emmerson; One Hundred and Sixteenth New-York, commanded by Colonel George M. Love; One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York, commanded by Captain Prentiss; One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York, commanded by Colonel Currie. The engineer regiment and officers of the Thirteenth army corps were also employed. I feel that I have done but feeble justice to the work or the persons engaged in it. Being severely indisposed, I feel myself unable to go into further details. I trust some future historian will treat this matter as it deserves to be treated, because it is a subject in which the whole country should feel an interest, and the noble men who succeeded so admirably in this arduous task, should not lo
wedges driven forward by plungers at the base of the shot. i, Woodbury, a spirally grooved projectile, with a sabot similarly grooved, for firing from a smooth-bore gun. j, Taggart, has a spirally flanged central aperture intended to cause the bullet to rotate on its axis by atmospheric action when fired from a smooth-bore gun. k, Sigourney, has projecting spiral ribs to take the grooves and impart rotary motion, and annular belts which fit the lands and direct the flight. l, the Currie ball, conoidal at each end, and having an annular groove deepening from front to rear, into which is cast a soft-metal packing-ring. m, a bolt with chisel-edged points for cutting through iron plating. The annular groove between the cutting-edges and the point is filled with soft metal, to prevent retardation of the flight. n, an elongated bullet with spiral flanges for imparting rotary motion when fired from a smoothbore gun. It will be obvious to practical men that some of the last
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Maryland Volunteers. (search)
l 6-7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Danville April 23-29. Duty in the Department of Virginia till August. Mustered out August 8, 1865. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 65 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 130 Enlisted men by disease. Total 201. 1st Maryland Regiment Potomac home Brigade Cavalry.--(Cole's.) Originally organized at Cole's (Co. A ), Furey's (Co. B ), Horner's (Co. C ) and Currie's (Co. D ). Independent Cavalry Companies organized at Frederick, Md., August 10 to November 27, 1861. Served unattached, Dept. of West Virginia, to January, 1862. Lander's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862 (Cos. A, C and D ). Unattached, West Virginia, to August, 1862 (Co. B ). Hatch's Cavalry Brigade, Banks' 5th Army Corps, and Dept. of the Shenandoah to June, 1862. Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to August, 1862, and participated in the f
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1842. (search)
a line of skirmishers, let me tell you, is not a thing very often done; indeed, I do not think it was ever attempted. It looked like a forlorn hope at the start. My officers appreciated the nature of the attempt, and so did many of my men, —but no one thought of hesitating. I was, at twenty minutes past two, ordered to advance, and at the word Forward! my men went off as if on skirmish drill. It was elegant! First my skirmishers, then my reserves. So handsome was the advance, that Colonel Currie, of the One Hundred and Thirty-third New York, who was in the thickest of the fight, on the other side of the bayou, and his men, gave three cheers. I heard the cheers, and thought it was some success over there. I had found, in my movement during the last quarter of an hour, that I was a spotted man. I was the only person mounted, and every now and then the bullets whistled round me thick, and I thought more of my gallant horse than I did of myself. I don't quite understand it now, b
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
374. Crane, Peter, Major, I. 72. Crane, P. M., Dr., II. 374. Crane, Susan H. D., II. 374. Crane, W. D., Capt., Memoir, II. 364, 365;, 366. Also, II. 368, 370;, 371. Crawford, S. W., Brig.-Gen., II. 87. Crittenden, E. W., Brig.-Gen., II. 138. Crosby and Nichols, I 42. Crowninshield, Caroline M., II. 433. Crowninshield, Caspar, Col., I. 338; II. 105, 106, 180. Crowninshield, E. A., II. 433. Crowninshield, F. W., Lieut., Memoir, II. 433-437. Also, II. 445. Currie, Col., I. 66. Curtis, Arthur, Capt., II. 16. Curtis, G. S., Col., I. 432, Cushing, Caleb, Hon., I. 21, 255;. Cushing, Edmund, Hon., I. 239. Cushing, Thomas, II. 264. Cushman, R., Elder, II. 275. Cushman, Samuel, Hon., II. 275. Custer, G. A., Maj.-Gen., I. 303. D. Dale, W. J., Dr., I. 228. Dalton, Mr., I. 286. Dana, David, Dr., I. 411, 412;. Dana, N. J. T., Maj.-Gen., I. 123, 213;, 217, 422, 423; II. 307. Dana, R. H., Jr., I 256, 264; II. 199. Dav
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
usiasm were very remarkable, and were very remarkably expressed, as he showed me a large collection of Burns's original Mss., beginning with the earliest effusions, as contained in the copy-books mentioned, I believe, in his brother's letter to Dr. Currie, and ending with the last letter he ever wrote,—the letter to his wife,—which, if I recollect right, concludes Dr. Currie's collection. These papers, Mr. Roscoe seems to preserve with a sort of holy reverence, and he read me from among them seDr. Currie's collection. These papers, Mr. Roscoe seems to preserve with a sort of holy reverence, and he read me from among them several characteristic love-letters, and some Jacobite pieces of poetry, which have never been, and never will be published, with a degree of feeling which would have moved me in one of my own age, and was doubly interesting in an old man. Mr. Ticknor left Liverpool on the 17th of May, and arrived in London on the 25th of the same month, travelling in the leisurely style of those days; passing through Chester, St. Asaph's, Llangollen, Shrewsbury, Birmingham, and Warwick; everywhere charmed wit
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
battalion, who were finally compelled to substitute their own flag for the riddled garrison flag. On the 4th, Major Elliott remarked, regarding the rifled shells: The practice with these projectiles is very beautiful, the adjustment of the time fuses being so perfect that the occupants of the gorge wall are secure from the effects of the explosion, which rarely fails to occur during the passage of the shell over the parade. On the 6th the flagstaff was again shot away, and replaced by Sergeant Currie and Corporal Montgomery of the Twenty-fifth South Carolina. On the 12th, again, some of the Georgians had the honor of replacing the flag under fire. Hardly a day passed without some one being killed and several more or less seriously wounded. During the week ending November 16th, over 3,000 shots were fired at Sumter, and on the night of the 19th a second attempt was made to land a force from barges and storm the ruins, but Elliott and his men were on guard, and their musketry fire
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