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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 85 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 38 32 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 35 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 25 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 25 3 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 15 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Curtis or search for Curtis in all documents.

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ors Terrence and Hubbard, with 450 men, attacked Poindexter, with 1,000 to 1,300 men, on Sliver Creek. The enemy were totally rented, with heavy loss; seven left dead of the field, many carried off; from fifty to seventy-five wounded. Our loss reported after four killed. The rebel camp was destroyed, and a large number of horses and arms taken. A heavy fog alone saved them from complete destruction. The number of prisoners are reported at thirty. (Singed.) John Palmer, Brig. Gen. Brig. Gen. Curtis, at Rolla, also reports that two captains and fourteen privates have just been taken prisoners. Arrest of a native of Lynchburg. A Washington dispatch, of the 16th inst., says: Banker Smith's son, just arrested here, is a native of Lynchburg, Virginia, has arrived here since 1854, and always voted for Southern proclivities. The proof against him is that, in a rebel mailbag recently seized on its way across the Potomac, a letter to the rebel General was found containing