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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for George T. Curtis or search for George T. Curtis in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 31: the prison—discipline debates in Tremont Temple.—1846-1847. (search)
ngue. The discussions of 1846 and 1847, which had discredited the character of the managers for efficiency, fairness, and breadth of view, were a fatal blow to the Society, and it never recovered public confidence. In May, 1848, Sumner appeared before the managers, and sought in vain to impress them with his views in favor of more vigorous action. the same month, the Society decided to hold no more public meetings, and recalled the notice of one already announced. Mr. Ticknor and George T. Curtis attended the meeting where this decision was made, and both were chosen officers for the first time. They had taken no interest in the subject before, and their political hostility to Sumner and Dr. Howe, as well as Mr. Ticknor's kinship with Mr. Eliot, account for their selection. Eliot became president; and Dwight continued in office till his death, in 1854. In 1855 no officers were chosen, and Mr. Eliot took the chair in the presence of three reporters and only two members. The o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
ils. Speeches, May 14 June 24.1846; March 1, 1847; March 17, 23, 1848. Webster's Life, by G. T. Curtis, vol. II. pp. 291, 301, 302, 315. He seemed only in earnest when he was supporting the no tegy which he had made in Congress six weeks after it was given. Works, vol. i. p. 316-329. G. T. Curtis defended Winthrop at length in a speech Boston Advertiser, Oct. 3, 1846. The letter showed pregates, exceeding one hundred in number, among whom were Winthrop, Adams, J. Lothrop Motley, G. T. Curtis, and P. w. Chandler. Rev. A. P. Putnam,— then a youth, since well known as a clergyman,—aftes presence at the Whig State conventions in 1846 and 1847 is not mentioned by his biographer, G. T. Curtis, and his speeches on those occasions are omitted from Everett's edition of his Works; but therticles, with coarse personalities. Dec. 30, 1847; Jan. 3, 27, 29, Feb. 3, March 17, 1848. G. T. Curtis entered into the controversy on the same side and with the same spirit, assuming a supercilio
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
und wise and brave protectors in Theodore Parker, Dr. Henry I. Bowditch, Ellis Gray Loring, and Mrs. George S. Hillard. They were skilfully secreted and sent to England. The next February (1851), when the case of Shadrach was pending before G. T. Curtis, a commissioner, a body of colored men forced the door of the court room, and the negro, being taken from the officers, escaped to Canada. President Fillmore at once issued a proclamation, directing the army and navy to co-operate in enforcinple of the Wilmot Proviso, and had even voted for its application to the territories acquired from Mexico, whose fate was again in question. Lodge's Life of Webster, pp. 292, 321; Wilson's Rise and Fall of the Slave Power, vol. II. p. 241; G. T. Curtis's Life of Webster, vol. II. p. 307, note. He now announced that he should vote against the insertion of the prohibition in any bill or resolution providing a government for those territories. He defended this change of position by maintainin
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
13, 14, 1850; Courier, March 11. and by the people of Massachusetts with surprise and indignation. His biographer, G. T. Curtis, admits this adverse opinion, vol. II. p. 410. The Whig press of New England, with rare exceptions, condemned his unebster, as early as January 21, admitted Clay to a confidence as to his purpose which he withheld from his own people. G. T. Curtis's Life of Webster, vol. II. p. 397. and at first only one Whig newspaper The Newburyport Herald. in Massachusetts,t, Perkins, Fearing, Appleton, Haven, Amory, Sturgis, Thayer, and Hooper; lawyers like Choate, Lunt, B. R. Curtis, and G. T. Curtis; physicians like Jackson and Bigelow; scholars like Ticknor, Everett, Prescott, Sparks, Holmes, and Felton; divines li agitation against them must cease. Webster's followers joined heartily in the execution of the Fugitive Slave law. G. T. Curtis sat as commissioner to hear cases under it. B. R. Curtis aided with his legal opinion. George Lunt, district attorney
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
s? Certainly that it abounded with instruction and the highest interest for me. On our route to Rome in the vettura, I should think we talked together nearly three quarters of the time continuously. We discussed literary subjects,—Hannibal's campaigns, Italian writers, Manzoni's Promessi Sposi; French and Italian morals; love, including some of Sumner's experiences; society, wherein S. told me a great deal of his English and foreign acquaintanceships; law, including his relations with George T. Curtis, B. F. Hallett, Judge Fletcher, R. C. Winthrop, George S. Hillard, etc.; persons, including Prescott, Bancroft, Lord Brougham, Bunsen, Tocqueville, etc. I broached to him my criminal law theories, and he encouraged me to pursue them, suggesting the aid that I should find in Bentham. He also spoke of having read an Italian criminalist whose name was not familiar to me, but whom he praised with great warmth. He told me curious chapters in Franklin's history; . . . in Lord Palmerton's, w
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
twenty-two thousand; and Breckinridge, six thousand. In the electoral colleges Lincoln received one hundred and eighty votes; Breckinridge, seventy-two; Bell, thirty-nine; and Douglas, twelve. The Unionists in the South were divided between Douglas and Bell. In the North the rump of the Whig party—those antipathetic to antislavery sentiments—supported Bell and Everett; and their leaders in Massachusetts were chiefly the old opponents of the Conscience Whigs,—Winthrop, Eliot, Stevenson, G. T. Curtis, Walley, and Hillard. Some of these leaders are described in the New York Tribune; September 17, and the Boston Atlas and Bee, September 28. Felton, at this time President of Harvard College, and George Ticknor voted for Bell and Everett. The Whig conservatism of Boston had been broken up; but a remnant of five thousand votes was given in the city for Bell and Everett, principally cast by voters having a mercantile interest or connection, while the masses gave nearly ten thousand vote<