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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 123 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 89 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 86 2 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 85 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 56 4 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 31 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 1 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Samuel R. Curtis or search for Samuel R. Curtis in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
tion north of Ironton, and, moving thence rapidly without tents or baggage, take the city by assault. Possession of the city would give him possession of the State, and the enemy would supply the arms for the thousands of volunteers that would flock to his standard. From this day-dream he was rudely awakened a few days later by news that Price had been driven from Springfield on the 12th of February, and was hotly pursued by a Federal army which Halleck had sent against him under General S. R. Curtis. With this army was Captain P. H. Sheridan, doing duty Major-General Henry W. Halleck. From a photograph. as quartermaster. Price sought refuge in the mountains of Arkansas, and February 21st was within thirty miles of Van Buren, near which place was McCulloch. On learning all this Van Dorn hastened to Van Buren and thence to Price's headquarters, which he reached on the 1st of March. After a hurried consultation with Price and McCulloch, he decided to instantly attack Curt
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
as doubtful about my personal relations to General Curtis, which had been somewhat troubled by his sles west of McKissick's farm; by order of General Curtis, another detachment under Major Mezaros wecapture, as I had not only been advised by General Curtis on the 5th, after nightfall, of the advanc road, on which there are a few clearings, General Curtis prolonged his line of battle. Another hol was in progress, I received an order from General Curtis at 2 o'clock p. M. to reinforce Colonels O so, as I had been out in our front before General Curtis met me, and had found that our line was weith his regiment, was posted as directed. General Curtis declared himself satisfied and rode off, bllas Battery. On the extreme right, where General Curtis had directed the movements of the troops, and my driver. Pratt's store, near which General Curtis's headquarters tent was pitched, is still and compelled to retreat. On the other hand, Curtis was surprised by the sudden turn things had ta[16 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Union and Confederate Indians in the civil War. (search)
under Pike and Cooper, also participated in the battle of Pea Ridge in March, 1862, where they were charged with scalping and mutilating the Federal dead on the field. General Pike, hearing of the scalping, called on the surgeon and assistants of his field-hospital for reports, and in their reports they stated that they found one of the Federal dead Who had been scalped. General Pike then issued an order, denouncing the outrage in the strongest language, and sent a copy of the order to General Curtis. General Pike claimed that part of the Indians were in McCulloch's corps in the first day's battle; and that the scalping was done at night in a quarter of the field not occupied by the Indian troops under his immediate command. After Pea Ridge the operations of the Confederate Indians under General Cooper and Colonel Stand Watie were confined, with a few exceptions, to the Indian Territory. In connection with white troops from Texas, they participated in several engagements with the F
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. (search)
The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. The composition and losses of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured.-Editors. Composition and losses of the Union army. Brig.-Gen. Samuel R. Curtis. First and Second divisions, Brig.-Gen. Franz Sigel. First Division, Col. Peter J. Osterhaus. First Brigade: 25th Ill., Col. William N. Coler; 44th Ill., Col. Charles Knobelsdorff; 17th Mo., Major August H. Poten. Brigade loss: k, 4; w, 22; m, 11 = 37. Second Brigade, Col. Nicholas Greusel. 36th Ill., Col. Nicholas Greusel; 12th Mo., Major Hugo Wangelin; Illinois Cavalry (2 Cos.), Captains Albert Jenks and Henry A. Smith. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 66; m, 36 = 109. Artillery: Mo. Battery, Capt. Martin Welfiey; 4th Ohio Battery, Capt. Louis Hoffmann. Loss: w, 6; m, 4 = 10. Second Division, Brig.-Gen. Alexander Asboth (w). Staff loss:
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
quate force in such a manner as to hold the enemy in check, guard the frontier, and hold the barren [River] till the winter terminates the campaign; or, if any fault in his movements is committed, or his lines become exposed when his force is developed, to attack him as opportunity offers. this sums the situation. in January, 1862, General Johnston found himself confronted by Halleck in the West, and by Buell, who had succeeded Sherman, in Kentucky. With the exception of the army under Curtis in Missouri, about twelve thousand strong, the whole resources of the North-West, from Pennsylvania to the plains, were turned against General Johnston's lines in Kentucky. Halleck, with armies at Cairo and Paducah, under Grant and C. F. Smith, threatened equally Columbus, the key of the Mississippi River, and the water-lines of the Cumberland and Tennessee, with their defenses, at Forts Donelson and Henry. Buell's right wing also menaced Donelson and Henry, while his center was directed ag