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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Autobiographical sketch. (search)
ment, under the command of the Colonel, moved to Buena Vista, a few miles from Saltillo, and joined the forces of General Wool, at that point. It remained near that locality for the balance of the war, for the most part inactive, as all fighting on that line, except an occasional affair with guerillas, ceased after the battle of Buena Vista. I had, therefore, no opportunity of seeing active service. For a short time I was attached, as acting Inspector General, to the staff of Brigadier General Caleb Cushing, who commanded the brigade to which my regiment was attached, until he was ordered to the other line. During this period I contracted, in the early part of the fall of 1847, a cold and fever, which eventuated in chronic rheumatism, with which I have ever since been afflicted. My condition became such that I received a leave of absence in the month of November, and returned to the States, on a visit to my friends in the Kanawha Valley. After improving a little I started bac
sed to come in the evening and talk his strong common-sense. Sometimes he favored me with shrewd criticisms of men and things. Once he was very indignant with Mr. Cushing for ripping out his scientific stuff to impress me; but I have found, and so told Mr. Cushing, that I do not know much, but things I do know well, he does not. Mr. Cushing, that I do not know much, but things I do know well, he does not. Once Mr. Guthrie sat down in one of the trumpery chairs in our furnished house, and being very tired, dropped asleep. He was a very large man and proved too much for the chair, so it gave way with a crack which wakened him. He rose deliberately, examined the chair for some minutes, then looked at me quizzically, and said, You know a man is heavier when he is asleep, do you suppose it possible I could have been asleep? He lived a few doors from us, and Mr. Cushing boarded not far off. Mr. Campbell lived more in the centre of the city, and Governor Marcy only a few squares from the Executive Mansion. Mr. Dobbin, the Secretary of the Navy, was also quite n
household. The Honorable William Appleton, Robert C. Winthrop, Caleb Cushing, Edward Everett, Colonel Charles Green, of The Post, Professor hink, was considered a kind of ward politician. This speech and Mr. Cushing's address of welcome are here quoted to show the tone Mr. Davis all was packed and the meeting was enthusiastic. The Honorable Caleb Cushing introduced Mr. Davis to the assembly in the following speech, om the Boston Morning Post, October 12, 1858. The welcome of Mr. Cushing was extremely cordial, cheer upon cheer going up in token of thetion of the Democrats of this locality. Address of Honorable Caleb Cushing. Mr. President, Fellow-Citizens: I present myself beforso long and so happily enjoyed. Your own great statesman (the Hon. Caleb Cushing) who has introduced me to this assembly, has been too long nd these, added to the address of my old and intimate friend, General Cushing, bear to me fresh testimony, which I shall be happy to carry a
s made to proceed to an election for President, on April 30th, Louisiana, Alabama, South Carolina, Florida, and Texas withdrew in orderly procession; Tennessee, Kentucky, California, and Oregon followed. The president of the convention, General Caleb Cushing, then withdrew; a part of the Massachusetts delegation followed. Some few delegates from five of the eight seceding States remained, and the convention passed a resolution to recommend the Democratic party of the several States to supply two sections are not the same people, but are the complement of each other, and their extreme opinions would have thus been modified by the education of each in the other's sphere. In Baltimore. June 18th, the convention met again with General Cushing again in the chair. Everyone who could find standing room went from the adjacent cities. It put one in mind of the old Scotch song, O little wot ye wha's coming. New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Ohio, Illinois, Kentucky, Ten
troops are stationed at Cairo, Illinois. Of these, says the Charleston Courier of the 30th April, fully three hundred are supposed to be negroes, and the remainder have been picked up from the gutters of Chicago, and among the Dutch. A force of one thousand firm-hearted Southern men would drive them from the place, if the attack was properly made. The members of the Brown High School at Newburyport, Mass., raised the American flag near their school building in the presence of a large concourse of citizens. Patriotic speeches were made by Caleb Cushing and others.--(Doc. 96.) John Letcher, governor of Virginia, issued a proclamation authorizing the release of all private vessels and property seized by the State except the steamships Jamestown and Yorktown; advising the people to return to their usual avocations, promising them protection, and appealing to them not to interfere with peaceable, unoffending citizens who preserve the peace and conform to our laws. --(Doc. 97.)
April 23. Lieutenant Cushing, with a party of men belonging to the National gunboat Commodore Barney, with a small howitzer, visited Chuckatuck, Va., where he encountered and defeated forty rebel cavalrymen, killing two, and capturing three of their horses fully equipped. Lieutenant Cushing lost one man killed.--The British schooner St. George was captured off New Inlet, N. C., by the National steamer Mount Vernon.--The sloop Justina was captured off the Little Bahama Bank, by the gunboa23. Lieutenant Cushing, with a party of men belonging to the National gunboat Commodore Barney, with a small howitzer, visited Chuckatuck, Va., where he encountered and defeated forty rebel cavalrymen, killing two, and capturing three of their horses fully equipped. Lieutenant Cushing lost one man killed.--The British schooner St. George was captured off New Inlet, N. C., by the National steamer Mount Vernon.--The sloop Justina was captured off the Little Bahama Bank, by the gunboat Tioga.
he gunboats Commodore Barney, General Jessup, and Cohasset made an expedition up the James River. At a point seven miles from Fort Darling, near Dutch Gap, a torpedo was exploded under the bows of the Commodore Barney, by a lock-string connected with the shore. The explosion was terrific. It lifted the gunboat's bows full ten feet out of the water, and threw a great quantity of water high into the air, which, falling on the deck, washed overboard fifteen of the crew. Among them was Lieutenant Cushing, the Commander of the Commodore Barney. Two sailors were drowned. All the rest were saved. Major-General Foster was on board the boat when the explosion took place. The rebels then opened upon them from the shore with a twelve-pound field-piece. The Barney was penetratedt by fifteen shots, beside a great number of musket-balls; but not a man was injured except the paymaster, who was slightly wounded by splinters. The gunboat Cohasset received five twelve-pound shots, one of whi
Doc. 21.-capture of the Caleb Cushing, In the harbor of Portland, me., June 27, 1863. Portland, June 29, 1863. since the fight between the Enterprise and Boxer, in our waters, during the last war with Great Britain, there has not been so much excitement in this city as there was last Saturday. Early in the morning it was reported that the revenue cutter Caleb Cushing had been surreptitiously taken out of the harbor. Various rumors were afloat respecting it. One was that Lieutlots, but they would not serve. Took positions from coast survey charts. Got in at sunset and anchored below Munjoy. Had no communication with the shore. Waited until half-past 12 midnight, when moon went down, then rowed direct to cutter Caleb Cushing in two boats with muffled oars. Boarded one on each side, seized her crew without resistance and ironed them. Captured Lieutenant Davenport as he came on deck. Weighed anchor, being unable to slip the cable, and started at three A. M., goi
general officer upon that part of the field, and to check the farther advance of the enemy was of the utmost importance. I hastily gathered and placed in position all the artillery then in reach, including a portion of Standart's, Cockerill's, Cushing's, and Russell's batteries; in all, about twenty pieces, and with the aid of all the mounted officers and soldiers I could find, succeeded in checking and rallying a sufficient number of straggling infantry to form a fair line in support of the ning of all the artillery with grape checked and put to rout the confronting columns of the enemy. It is due Lieutenants Baldwin, First Ohio volunteer artillery, commanding Standart's battery, Cockerill of the same regiment, commanding battery, Cushing and Russell, Fourth United States artillery, commanding batteries, to state that for accuracy in manoeuvring and firing their guns in the immediate presence of the enemy on the occasion above referred to, the army and country are placed under la
ury themselves harmlessly in the parapet, while from their protected position they maintained a destructive fight with the gunboats. The Mount Washington, already disabled in an unequal contest with a battery higher up, grounded off Hill's Point, directly under the rebel guns. Her companions refused to leave her in this emergency, and then for six long hours raged one of the most desperate and unequal contests of the war. The gallant Lamson, on his crippled-vessel, and the equally gallant Cushing, stood over their smoking guns and bleeding gunners till the rising tide at last floated them off in safety. The Commodore Barney showed one hundred and fifty-eight ball and bullet-holes in her hull and machinery; the Mount Washington was even worse riddled. Admiral Lee having now ordered the gunboats out of the Upper Nansemond, matters wore a desperate aspect. At this crisis the fertile genius of Lieutenant Lamson devised a plan which was approved by General Peck, the conception of wh
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