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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.94 (search)
close range, came back on our own decks. Commander Roe was asked to correct his report as to the speed of our ship. He had said we were going at a speed of ten knots, and the naval report says, He was not disposed to make the original correction. I should think not!--when the speed could Paymaster George De F. Barton, Acting aide and signal officer to commander Roe during the engagement with the Albemarle. from a photograph. Acting Master Charles A. Boutelle, U. S. N. Commander W. B. Cushing, U. S. N. only be estimated by his own officers, and the navigator says clearly in his report eleven knots. We had, perhaps, the swiftest ship in the navy. We had backed slowly to increase the distance; with furious fires and a gagged engine working at the full stroke of the pistons,--a run of over four hundred yards, with eager and excited men counting the revolutions of our paddles; who should give the more correct statement? Another part of the official report states that t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.95 (search)
The destruction of the Albemarle. by W. B. Cushing, commander, U. S. N. Part of the smoke-stack of the Albemarle. In September, 1864, the Government was laboring under much anxiety in regard to the condition of affairs in the sounds of North Carolina. Some months previous (April 19th) a rebel iron-clad had made her appearance, attacking and recapturing Plymouth, beating our fleet, and sinking the Southfield. Some time after (May 5th), this iron-clad, the Albemarle, had steamed out into the open sound and engaged seven of our steamers, doing much damage and suffering little. The Sassacus had attempted to run her down, but had failed, and had had her boiler exploded. [See p. 628.] The Government had no iron-clad that could cross Hatteras bar and enter the sounds, Several light-draught monitors were in course of construction at this time, but were not yet completed.--editors. and it was impossible for any number of our vessels to injure the ram at Plymouth. At th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
rd division, Commodore Jas. Findlay Schenck; Fourth division, Commodore S. W. Godon; iron-Clad division, Commodore Wm. Radford. Flag-ship. Malvern, Lieut. William B. Cushing (1st attack); Lieut. B. H. Porter (k), (2d attack). Iron-Clads. Canonicus, Lieut.-Com. George E. Belknap. Mahopac, Lieut.-Com. E. E. Potter (1st ats. Tacony, Lieut.-Com. W. T. Truxtun. Miscellaneous vessels. Fort Jackson, Capt. B. F. Sands. Monticello, Act. V.-Lieut. D. A. Campbell (1st attack); Lieut. W. B. Cushing (2d attack). Nereus, Com. J. C. Howell. Quaker City, Com. W. F. Spicer. Rhode Island, Com. S. D. Trenchard. Santiago de Cuba, Capt. O. S. Glisson. Vanderbi. Chester (w). Sassacus, 37 men, Act. Ens. W. H. Mayer. Tacony, 32 men, Act. Ens. J. B. Taney. Fort Jackson, 69 men, Lieut. S. H. Hunt. Monticello, 41 men, Lieut. W. B. Cushing. Nereus, 61 men, Act. Ens. E. G. Dayton. Rhode Island, 47 men, Lieut. F. R. Smith. Santiago de Cuba, 53 men, Lieut. N. H. Farquhar. Vanderbilt, 70 men (est
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
ron. The most striking operation in the James River and adjacent waters in 1863 was the defense of the Nansemond, April 12-26. A sudden movement in force was made by the Confederates to cross the river and thereby reach Suffolk to attack General Peck. Admiral Lee hastily dispatched two flotillas to hold the line of the river: one composed of the Stepping Stones and seven other gun-boats under Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, in the upper Nansemond, and the other of four gun-boats under Lieutenant William B. Cushing, in the lower waters. Of special importance were the capture on the 19th of April of the battery at Hill's Point, by Lieutenant Lamson's flotilla, in conjunction with three hundred men under General Getty, and a landing expedition on the 22d to Chuckatuck, several miles inland, under Lieutenant Gushing. After several months of inaction it was decided in August, 1863, to make a reconnoissance up the James River. The force consisted of the monitor Sangamon, the ferry-boat Comm