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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
and he judiciously posted artillery in reserve under Colonel R. O. Tyler. the batteries of Bancroft, Dilger, Eakin, Wheeler, Hill, and Taft, under Major Osborne, were placed in the Cemetery, where the kind and thoughtful General Howard had caused the tombstones, and such monuments as could possibly be moved, to be laid flat on the ground, to prevent their being injured by shot and shell. On the left of the Cemetery, near Zeigler's Grove, were Hancock's batteries, under Woodruff, Brown, Cushing, Arnold, and Rorty, commanded by Captain Hazzard. Next to these, on the left, was Thomas's battery, with those of Thompson, Phillips, Hart, Rauth, Dow, Ames, and Sterling, under McGilvray, in reserve. On the extreme left were the batteries of Gibbs and Hazlett, the latter now commanded by Lieutenant Rittenhouse. at midday there was an ominous silence, during which General Lee entered Pennsylvania College building, which he was using for a hospital, ascended to the cupola, and, in viol
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
inia to that of Maine. Swift cruisers were sent after the Tacony. when informed of this, Read transferred his crew and armament to the prize schooner Archer, and destroyed the Tacony. then he went boldly to the entrance of the harbor of Portland, Maine, June 24, 1868. and at midnight sent two armed boats to seize the revenue cutter Cushing, lying there. It was done, when chase after the pirates was successfully made by two merchant steamers, hastily armed and manned for the purpose. The Cushing and Archer, with the pirates, were soon taken back to Port land, where the marauders were lodged in prison. later in the year another daring act of piracy was committed. The merchant steamer Chesapeake, plying between New York and Portland, was seized on the 6th of December, by sixteen of her passengers, who proved to be pirates in disguise. They overpowered the officers, killed and threw overboard one of the engineers, and took possession of the vessel. She was soon afterward seized
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
a bugbear to the blockading vessels; and finally, late in October, Lieutenant William B. Cushing, one of the most daring of the young officers of the navy, undertooeet in width. A small steam launch, equipped as a torpedo boat, was placed in Cushing's charge, and on a dark night October 27, 1864. he moved, in her, toward Plymf the ram, before the pickets of the latter discovered the danger, when William B. Cushing. they sprang their rattles, rang the bell, hailed, and commenced firing aunch. The Confederates kept up a fire at fifteen feet range, and called upon Cushing to surrender. He refused, and ordered his men to save themselves as they migh shot. But the most of the party were captured or drowned. Only one, besides Cushing, escaped. The latter managed to reach the shore, and just at daylight, almost ruin, and had settled down upon the mud at the wharf. On the following night Cushing captured a skiff belonging to a Confederate picket, and at eleven o'clock was
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 18: capture of Fort Fisher, Wilmington, and Goldsboroa.--Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--Stoneman's last raid. (search)
t, when several of the lighter draught vessels went into the Cape Fear River. He also dispatched the gallant Cushing, See page 472. who was then in command of the Monticello, to ascertain the state of affairs on the right bank of the river. Cushing soon reported success, by raising the National flag over Fort Caswell and Smithville, Lieutenant Cushing displayed blockade-runner signal-lights, and decoyed two of them under the guns of Fort Caswell, where they were captured. They were ladLieutenant Cushing displayed blockade-runner signal-lights, and decoyed two of them under the guns of Fort Caswell, where they were captured. They were laden with arms and other supplies for the Conspirators. when preparations were made for taking up the torpedoes, and ascending the river in the lighter vessels, the heavier being excluded by the shallowness of the water. General Terry posted his troops at his intrenched line across the peninsula, two or three miles above Fort Fisher. But it was considered imprudent to attempt an advance until the army should be re-enforced, for Hoke was holding Fort Anderson, on the river, about half-way between
a British port, 2.569; details of her conflict with and destruction by the Kearsarge, 3.435. Albany, Democratic convention at, 1.207. Albemarle, ram, at the siege of Plymouth, 3.470; fight of with the Sassacus, 3.471; destruction of by Lieut. Cushing, 3.472. Albemarle Sound, naval operations in, 2.176; Gen. Reno's expedition on, 2.314. Alexandria, occupation of by Union troops, 1.482. Alexandria, La., occupation of by National troops, 3.254; abandonment of by Gen. Banks's forces,ndoned by Morgan, 2.502; recaptured by Burnside's troops, 3.129. Curtin, Gov., calls out militia of Pennsylvania, 3.52. Curtis, Gen. S. R., operations of in Arkansas, 2.250-2.260; his march from Batesville to the Mississippi, 2.525. Cushing, Lieut., destroys the ram Albemarle, 3.472. Custer, Gen., raid of to Berner's Bridge, 3.291. Custom-house at Charleston, seized by the State, 1.139. Cynthiana, burnt by the guerrilla Morgan, 3.232. D. Dahlgren, Admiral John A., in com