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James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cushing or search for Cushing in all documents.

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cavalry, and more than once abandoned by their infantry supports, both officers and enlisted men manfully stood by their guns with a courage and devotion worthy of the highest commendation. Where all did so well, it would be invidious to make distinction, and I therefore simply give the names of all the officers engaged viz.: Major Hunt; Captains Carlisle, Ayres, Griffin, Tidball, and Arnold; Lieutenants Platt, Ransom, Thompson, Webb, Barriga, Green, Edwards, Dresser, Wilson, Throckmorton, Cushing, Harris, Butler, Fuller, Lyford, Will, Benjamin, Babbitt, Haines, Ames, Hasbrouck, Kensel, Harrison, Reed, Barlow, Noyes, Kirby, Elderkin, Ramsay, and Craig. The two latter were killed. I am, sir, very respectfully your obedient servant, Wm. F. Barry, Major 5th Artillery. Medical and surgical report. Arlington, Department N. E. Va., July 26, 1861, Being chief of the Medical Staff with the Army in the Department of N. E. Virginia, I have the honor to make the following repor
re not wanted we can live within ourselves, and it shall be prohibited to send them abroad. Let them try that, and if England breaks the blockade for cotton, rice, and tobacco, make her say Please, sir, under the guns of our forts before she shall have a pound of any thing. Among all the extraordinary events of the last few months, the most surprising, the most marvellous, and the most fearful, is the palpable revelation that the people of the free States, high and low, from Everett and Cushing to the lowest Zouave, including Meagher, were fully ripe for a military despotism. They have accepted it without a moment's hesitation, given their Constitution to the winds, rushed into its embrace, and surrendered themselves without a murmur and without reserve, to the power of a man who is known to have no experience in arms or government, and who has shown himself to be a blackguard, a liar, and a coward. Such stupidity and baseness are without parallel in human history.--Charleston C