hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 82 6 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 55 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 55 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 20 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 37 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Custer or search for Custer in all documents.

Your search returned 44 results in 8 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Beverly ford. (search)
I found myself with my own regiment, the Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and at that moment the adjutant, Lieutenant Rudolph Ellis, was severely wounded, and turned his horse down the hill. I said a word to him, and was then immediately confronted by Captain Wesley Merritt, commanding the Second Regulars, who was dashing through the woods without a hat, having just lost it by a sabre cut. He was rewarded for his conspicuous gallantry on this day, and soon became a brigadier general; then, like Custer, a major general in good time, and one of the ablest and best of our cavalry commanders to the end of the war. Of Merritt and Ellis and a dozen more, I inquired in vain for General Buford. No one knew anything of him, but the fight went on briskly all the same.. Hurrying back then to the troops in the open, I reported to Major Whiting, of the Second Regulars, the senior officer present with the brigade, that I had a pressing order from General Pleasonton for General Buford to retire at
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), A campaign with sharpshooters. (search)
ridge. He gained the opposite bank in safety, but not without difficulty and danger, and the quick fire of the horse artillery from the other side soon gave assurance of his presence among the guns. Hemmed in on all sides at Appomattox, General Robert E. Lee's only hope was to cut his way through, and, by the abandonment of his guns and baggage, to force his path to the mountains. Having formed this resolution, Gordon was promptly dispatched forward, while the left flank was protected by moving in the four battalions of Wilcox's sharpshooters. Two of these were engaged, and two more were moving into action. But a period to the fighting of the sharpshooters and of all the rest of that incomparable infantry was now close at hand. When Custer rode through the Confederate lines, an officer of General Lee's staff was at once sent to recall the sharpshooters, and the sound of their bugles to Cease firing! in a few minutes silenced forever the guns of the Army of Northern Virginia.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
rtillery, which preceded the gallant but unsuccessful assault of Pickett's Division on our line, it was discovered that Stuart's cavalry was moving to our right, with the evident intention of passing to the rear, to make a simultaneous attack there. What the consequence of the success of this movement would have been, the merest tyro in the art of war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met by General Gregg, with two of his brigades (Colonels McIntosh and Irvin Gregg), and Custer's Brigade of the Third Division, and, on a fair field, there was another trial between two cavalry forces, in which most of the fighting was done in the saddle, and with the trooper's favorite weapon — the sabre. Without entering into the details of the fight, it need only be added, that Stuart advanced not a pace beyond where he was met; but after a severe struggle, which was only terminated by the darkness of night, he withdrew, and on the morrow, with the defeated army of Lee, was in re
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
with reference to the movements of that army. Now, on arriving at Frederick City, Maryland, my corps was reinforced by a third division, commanded by Kilpatrick, Custer, and Farnsworth, and it is assuming nothing to assert that what had been done by my two divisions in Virginia could be accomplished by three divisions with more eis first dispatch to Washington, and in the afternoon he received the reply making the appointments, and directing the officers to be assigned at once. They were Custer, Merritt, and Farnsworth; all three young captains, and two of them, Custer and Farnsworth, my aides-de-camp. While the General and myself were in conversation iCuster and Farnsworth, my aides-de-camp. While the General and myself were in conversation in reference to the campaign a second dispatch was brought him, stating that Stuart, with his cavalry, were making a raid near Washington City, and had cut the wires, so that we had no telegraphic communication. I laughed at this news, and said Stuart has served us better than he is aware of; we shall now have no instructions fro
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
der was actually engaged. And finally, General Custer, who was temporarily serving under General demonstration against the enemy. Finding General Custer's Brigade of the Third Cavalry Division oche Cavalry Corps, was received, directing that Custer's Brigade should at once join its division (Kifore one o'clock, for the purpose of relieving Custer, he found the latter in position, facing Gettyg them. In his official report of the battle, Custer mistakes the names of the roads on which he he, was at once ordered out, mounted, to relieve Custer's lines, and took position in the woods on the was yet some distance off, and Gregg, meeting Custer on the march in the opposite direction, ordered until the Third Brigade could be brought up. Custer, ever ready for a fight, was not loth to do soe's army towards the Potomac. In the evening, Custer's Brigade was ordered to join its division. Gry fight of the war. To borrow the language of Custer in his report of it: I challenge the annals of[10 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg (search)
tyro in the art of war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met by General Gregg with two of his brigades (Colonels McIntosh and Irvin Gregg) and Custer's Brigade of the Third Division; and, on a fair field, there was another trial between two cavalry forces, in which most of the fighting was done in the saddle, aful, would have been productive of the most serious consequences, determined me to retain the brigade of the Third Division until the enemy were driven back. General Custer, commanding the brigade, satisfied of the intended attack, was well pleased to remain with his brigade. Then follows a description of the disposition of hately after dark General Stuart withdrew his command. General Gregg occupied the field of the hand-to-hand fight and held possession of it during the night. General Custer, in his official report, writes: We held possession of the field until dark, during which time we collected our dead and wounded. It was true, then, that Stu
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
s, capturing prisoners, guns, and wagons, and saving the bridge over Middle river. For this General Custer, to whose division they belonged, complimented them in person. Next day Custer advanced upoCuster advanced upon Waynesborough, where Early's forces were intrenched, and, after some severe fighting, charged the works, driving the enemy out, capturing nearly every man, and all the guns and material of war. The widdie Court-House and Five Forks, the regiment won fresh laurels under the eyes of Sheridan and Custer. At Sailor's creek the First New York (Lincoln) Cavalry led the charge over the enemy's works, nd hundreds of prisoners, beside guns and battle-flags. At Appomattox Station they charged with Custer, in the darkness, and took hundreds of prisoners, many guns and wagons, beside four trains of stores, which were waiting for Lee's hungry army. And the next day they were dashing forward with Custer to attack the enemy, when they were stopped by news of the surrender of Lee. When the regime
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The famous fight at Cedar creek. (search)
memories of hard service, those who were among Custer's troopers in the Valley will not soon forget deployed to the right of the Valley pike, and Custer's Third extending from Merritt's right westwarg the line of the North fork Shenandoah river; Custer's on the right of the infantry, picketing a liself, escorted by the Second Ohio Cavalry from Custer's Division, passed on to Piedmont, east of theformer position, the divisions of Merritt and. Custer, aggregating nearly eight thousand of the finet the First Connecticut Cavalry, belonging to Custer's Division, had a unique and pleasant manner osuggesting an attack in force by cavalry. General Custer (than whom, by the way, the wars of the ceof sudden dying to complete the sacrifice. Custer's Division to the centre! was the laconic comy, the enemy was opposed only by Merritt's and Custer's cavalry and Getty's Division of infantry, wiheridan. Merritt on the left of the pike, and Custer on the right, met with no opposition from the