hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 82 6 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 55 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 55 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 20 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 37 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Custer or search for Custer in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 7 document sections:

. There have been affairs known as massacres, in which all, or nearly all, have lost their lives. In the battle of the Little Big Horn (1876), a fight between some hostile tribes of Indians and detachment of the Seventh U. S. Cavalry under Gen. Custer, the entire command of the latter was annihilated. Fourteen officers and 230 enlisted men were killed, including Gen. Custer. Not one escaped; each refused to surrender, and fought to the death. The next largest percentage of killed occuGen. Custer. Not one escaped; each refused to surrender, and fought to the death. The next largest percentage of killed occurred at Spotsylvania, in the Fifteenth New Jersey. This regiment belonged to the First Jersey Brigade, Wright's Division, Sixth Corps, and lost 116 killed or mortally wounded at Spotsylvania. Unlike the sudden loss of the First Minnesota at Gettysburg, its casualties occurred in three different actions: 31 were lost on May 8th, 5 on May 10th, and 80 on May 12th, at the Bloody Angle. It may be urged that, these being three different affairs, the losses should not be consolidated. If they had
h was killed. The casualties in the Cavalry Corps at Gettysburg amounted to 90 killed, 352 wounded, and 199 captured or missing; Not including loss of captured men (6th U. S. Cavalry) at Fairfield, Pa. total, 641, the heaviest loss falling on Custer's Michigan Brigade. Buford's Division had the honor of opening this historic battle, his long skirmish-line of dismounted troopers holding the enemy at bay until the First Corps arrived on the field. The Cavalry made some brilliant charges duriy of West Virginia. The cavalry fighting in the Shenandoah was a series of brilliant affairs, interspersed with skirmishes, which cost the corps a serious loss of life. Upon Sheridan's return to Petersburg he brought back with him Devin's and Custer's Divisions, which, added to Crooks' (formerly Gregg's) Division, restored — the organization to its original formation, General Merritt being in command of the three divisions. The corps started on the final campaign of 1865 with 37 regiments o
tack made by Pickett's Divisioni:--   Killed and Died of Wounds. 69th Pennsylvania Infantry 178 71st Pennsylvania Infantry 161 72d Pennsylvania Infantry 193 106th Pennsylvania Infantry 104   Total (during the war) 636 The gallant little Iowa Brigade (Belknap's) of the Seventeenth Corps:--   Killed and Died of Wounds. 11th Iowa Infantry 93 13th Iowa Infantry 119 15th Iowa Infantry 126 16th Iowa Infantry 105   Total (during the war) 443 Custer's famous Cavalry Brigade, which sustained the highest percentage of loss of any brigade in the mounted service:--   Killed and Died of Wounds. 1st Michigan Cavalry 164 5th Michigan Cavalry 141 6th Michigan Cavalry 135 7th Michigan Cavalry 85   Total (during the war) 525 the star Brigade — Heckman's. Eighteenth Corps.   Killed and Died of Wounds. 25th Massachusetts Infantry 161 27th Massachusetts Infantry 137 23d Massachusetts Infantry 84 9th
t served in Wilson's (3d) Division,--afterward Custer's. Eighth New York Cavalry--Rochester reg Division. This division was commanded by General Custer in the final campaign of 1865. Tenth the Carolinas. First Michigan Cavalry. Custer's Brigade — Kilpatrick's Division--Cavalry CorBrigade. In 1863 the regiment was assigned to Custer's Brigade of Michigan Cavalry. At Gettysburg harge against a superior force; a charge which Custer pronounced unequalled for brilliancy and gallad or captured. Fifth Michigan Cavalry. Custer's Brigade — Kilpatrick's Division--Cavalry Cor Michigan Cavalry was subsequently added. General Custer assumed command of the brigade while on itt its way out. Sixth Michigan Cavalry. Custer's Brigade — Kilpatrick's Division--Cavalry Coro retreat with a heavy loss. At Hawes's Shop, Custer's Brigade fought dismounted, the Sixth Regimeneland, who was succeeded in June, 1863, by General Custer. The brigade was mustered out on November<
30 16 57 2d Vermont Getty's Sixth 8 33 -- 41 1st Maine Cavalry Crook's Cavalry A. P. 23 107 12 142 1st New Jersey Cavalry Crook's Cavalry A. P. 11 43 34 88 8th Penn. Cavalry Crook's Cavalry A. P. 9 47 6 62 2d W. Va. Cav'y (7 Cos.) Custer's Cavalry A. S. 7 50 3 60 2d New York Cavalry Custer's Cavalry A. S. 9 44 -- 53 16th Penn. Cavalry Crook's Cavalry A. P. 9 43 5 57 Selma, Ala.             April 2, 1865.             17th Indiana Long's Cavalry 12 80 -- 92 SpanisCuster's Cavalry A. S. 9 44 -- 53 16th Penn. Cavalry Crook's Cavalry A. P. 9 43 5 57 Selma, Ala.             April 2, 1865.             17th Indiana Long's Cavalry 12 80 -- 92 Spanish Fort, Ala.             April 8, 1865.             8th Iowa Carr's Sixteenth 8 43 2 53 Fort Blakely, Ala.             April 9, 1865.             68th U. S. Colored Hawkins's ------------ 10 91 -- 101 76th Illinois Andrews's Thirteenth 17 81 -- 98 11th Wisconsin Garrard's Sixteenth 15 46 -- 61 8th Illinois Veatch's Thirteenth 10 54 -- 64 Although the fighting may be considered as having ended at Fort Blakely and Appomattox, s
    Aug., ‘61 1st New Jersey Reenlisted and served through the war. 12 116 128 4 185 189 317 Gregg's Cavalry, A. P. Aug., ‘63 2d New Jersey 3 48 51   190 190 241 Grierson's Cavalry, A. T. Jan., ‘64 3d New Jersey 3 47 50 2 105 107 157 Custer's Cavalry, A. P.   Light Batteries.                   Aug., ‘61 1st N. J. Reenlisted and served through the war. Hexamer's   3 3   12 12 15   Sixth. Sept., ‘61 2d N. J. Reenlisted and served through the war. Beam's 1 8 9   23 23 iments to preserve their organizations through the war. Of the distinguished generals in the Union Armies, a remarkably large number came from Ohio. Generals Sheridan, Rosecrans, Sherman, Griffin, Hunt, McPherson, Mitchel, Gillmore, McDowell, Custer, Weitzel, Kautz, William S. Smith, Crook, Stanley, Brooks, Leggett, the McCooks, Fuller, Steedman, Force, Banning, Ewing, Cox, Willich, Chas. R. Woods, Lytle, Garrard, Van Derveer, Beatty, Tyler, Harker, Opdycke, Carroll, and
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
52, 554 Connecticut regiments, list of, with loss in each 473 Conscription Act 532 Consolidation of regiments 9 Corps badges 64 Corps organizations in Union Army, history of 64 Craven, T. A., Commander U. S. N., mentioned 537 Custer massacre, loss at 27 Custer's Cavalry Brigade 120 Conclusion, suggestions in 574 Cowtan, Capt., Chas. W., quoted 478 Davenport, Alfred, quoted 28 Deaths from all causes classified 50 Deaths from miscellaneous causes 530 DeatCuster's Cavalry Brigade 120 Conclusion, suggestions in 574 Cowtan, Capt., Chas. W., quoted 478 Davenport, Alfred, quoted 28 Deaths from all causes classified 50 Deaths from miscellaneous causes 530 Deaths, total of, from all causes 526, 532 Deaths in Confederate armies, by States 554 Deaths in Confederate prisons 50, 529 Deaths in each arm of the service 48 Defeats and victories, lists of 541 Delaware regiments, list of, with loss in each 489 Denny, Capt. A. W., quoted 27 Desertions, number of 531 Disability, exemptions for 552 Disease, total of deaths from 48, 49, 528, 530 Disease, deaths from, in U. S. Navy 537 Disease, minimum of deaths from, in regiments 47