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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 30 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 3 1 Browse Search
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cruelties. The members of the convention have been indicted by the grand jury, and many of them arrested and held to bail. As to whether the civil authorities can mete out ample justice to the guilty parties on both sides, I must say it is my opinion, unequivocally, that they cannot. Judge Abell, whose course I have closely watched for nearly a year, I now consider one of the most dangerous men that we have here to the peace and quiet of the city. The leading men of the convention-King, Cutler, Hahn, and others — have been political agitators, and are bad men. I regret to say that the course of Governor Wells has been vacillating, and that during the late trouble he has shown very little of the man. P. H. Sheridan, Major-General Commanding. Subsequently a military commission investigated the subject of the riot, taking a great deal of testimony. The commission substantially confirmed the conclusions given in my despatches, and still later there was an investigation by a
e same time dispatched aid to his endangered right. Charge followed charge in quick succession, and the mutual carnage was fearful. Seeing that no impression was made by our attacks along the enemy's unshaken front, they were intermitted, while Cutler's and Griffin's divisions were detached from Warren and sent to the aid of Hancock, who still held fast to the captured work, but could not go beyond it while Lee made five successive and desperate assaults on him, with intent to hurl him back ; y Wilcox's and Heth's divisions (six brigades) of Hill's corps, but promptly and effectually repulsed with loss to the enemy; who there-upon sent Brown, with three brigades, to turn our right. This maneuver was well executed; the blow falling on Cutler's division while getting into position, crushing in his left, and throwing the whole into confusion. Pressing swiftly to their right, the charging column struck the right of Griffin's division, which was saved by refusing that flank, while Bartl
187. the rising of the people. by Elbridge Jefferson Cutler. poem delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Harvard University, July, 1861. The drum's wild roar awakes the land; the fife is calling shrill; Ten thousand starry banners blaze on town, and bay, and hill; Our crowded streets are throbbing with the soldiers' measured tramp; Among our bladed corn-fields gleam the white tents of the camp. The thunders of the rising war hush labor's drowsy hum, And heavy to the ground the first dark drops of battle come. The souls of men flame up anew; the narrow heart expands; And woman brings her patient faith to nerve her eager hands. Thank God! we are not buried yet, though long in trance we lay; Thank God! the fathers need not blush to own their sons to-day. Oh! sad and slow the weeks went by; each held his anxious breath, Like one who waits, in helpless fear, some sorrow great as death. Oh! scarcely was there faith in God, nor any trust in man, While fast along the Souther
Patriotism in Western Reserve College.--It is a noticeable fact, witnessing to the ardent patriotism of all concerned, that the entire body of students in Western Reserve College, with scarcely an exception, volunteered for three months, at the late call of the President after Banks's retreat, and have been accepted by Governor Tod. They number about seventy, and are ready for service, having been thoroughly drilled for a year past as one of the regular exercises of the College. Professors Young and Cutler go with them to Camp Chase, the former acting as captain till a company election has been held. Their term of service will close about the beginning of the new college year in September.
T. H. Squire, Surgeon Eighty-ninth N. Y. V., in a private letter from Roanoke Island, thus mentions a most affecting incident: The daughter of Dr. Cutler, Twenty-first Massachusetts, of whom I have spoken in a previous letter, died a few days ago at Newbern, of typhoid fever. Her remains were brought back to this island and buried to-day. Who will write her epitaph in befitting verse? She was the friend of the sick and wounded soldier; educated, accomplished, young, beautiful, affectionate, patriotic, pious, self-sacrificing. In her death in the van of the army, a woman pure and lovely has been laid as a victim upon the altar of Liberty. She died away from home; a father whom she loved stood by her, but his duties to the wounded prevented him from accompanying her remains to their temporary resting-place on this beautiful island. Sacred be the spot where her remains now lie! Ye winds that whisper in the pines, breathe her a requiem! Ye grapes and mistletoe that climb
house and other dwellings, past which the ammunition-train is winding down the road to the crossing. Warren's Fifth Corps was soon to need its ammunition. The infantry were all across by 4:30 in the afternoon of May 23d and, advancing over the ground seen in the lower picture, formed their lines on the edge of a wood half a mile beyond the south bank. The artillery was posted on the ridge. Before Warren could get into position Lee sent the whole of Hill's Corps against him. A brigade of Cutler's division was forced back, but after some sharp fighting the Confederates were driven back into their trenches, leaving many killed and wounded, and five hundred prisoners. The undisputed crossing at North Anna: the old Jericho Mill on North bank; the Gentry house is on the eminence above while the ammunition train approaches the pontoon bridge The undisputed crossing at North Anna: the old Jericho Mill on North bank; the Gentry house is on the eminence above while the ammunition tra
house and other dwellings, past which the ammunition-train is winding down the road to the crossing. Warren's Fifth Corps was soon to need its ammunition. The infantry were all across by 4:30 in the afternoon of May 23d and, advancing over the ground seen in the lower picture, formed their lines on the edge of a wood half a mile beyond the south bank. The artillery was posted on the ridge. Before Warren could get into position Lee sent the whole of Hill's Corps against him. A brigade of Cutler's division was forced back, but after some sharp fighting the Confederates were driven back into their trenches, leaving many killed and wounded, and five hundred prisoners. The undisputed crossing at North Anna: the old Jericho Mill on North bank; the Gentry house is on the eminence above while the ammunition train approaches the pontoon bridge The undisputed crossing at North Anna: the old Jericho Mill on North bank; the Gentry house is on the eminence above while the ammunition tra
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
, drill, and instruction were well maintained, supplies of all kinds abundantly furnished. The spirit of the men revived with the consciousness of their immense superiority in numbers and equipment, and it was with good show of reason that Hooker spoke of his army when it took the field, as the finest army on the planet. His organization was as follows, with the strength of each corps present for duty equipped on April 30. corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1stWadsworthPhelps, Cutler, Paul, Meredith1052 ReynoldsRobinsonRoot, Baxter, Leonard 16,908DoubledayRowley, Stone 2dHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook, Brook848 CouchGibbonSully, Owen, Hall 16,893FrenchCarroll, Hays, MacGregor 3dBirneyGraham, Ward, Hayman954 SicklesBerryCarr, Revere, Mott 18,721WhippleFranklin, Bowman, Berdan 5thGriffinBarnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
une 30, 1863 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 1st CorpsWadsworth Meredith, Cutler ReynoldsRobinsonPaul, Baxter 10,355RowleyBiddle, Stone, Stannard523 2d CorpsCaldwellCross, KeWadsworth's two brigades became engaged with Davis and Archer. Davis, on the left, overlapped Cutler on the Federal right and, of course, soon drove back his right wing along with Hall's battery, a it on the flank and captured Archer and several hundred prisoners. This blow to Archer relieved Cutler's brigade, which, changing front to its left, was able to cut off and capture two regiments of Davis's brigade which had advanced in pursuit of Cutler's right, and taken position in the cut of an unfinished railroad north of the Chambersburg Pike. Almost at the moment of his victory, however, soldier and was well known to have been the choice of the army to replace Hooker. Meanwhile, Cutler was now reenforced by Rowley's division of the same corps, which extended its line farther to th
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
9 Batts. CrawfordMcCandlessFisher54 Guns WadsworthCutlerRiceStone 6TH corps. Sedgwick, Wright WrightBrownth ours. Wadsworth's, the last division, now under Cutler, next made an attack upon our left, driving in our he attacked the lines held by Field's division with Cutler's and Crawford's divisions and Webb's and Carroll'sed two brigades of Ricketts's division and three of Cutler's to the 19 brigades already engaged. He also brouyond statements in the itineraries of Griffin's and Cutler's divisions that they were engaged, Griffin three and Cutler four hours, on the morning of the 12th. Can it be that two Federal divisions fought each other for hat, then, prolonged the engagements of Griffin and Cutler between three and four hours, of which no one givesut 6 P. M., he fell upon Griffin in the centre, and Cutler on the right, who had not fully formed their lines. Cutler was broken and pursued, but the artillery on that flank was able to save the situation and Hill was f
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