hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 15 results in 2 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
s known to stamp her childish foot, and cry, I don't care for old Ben Cutler! Nevertheless he was a saintly and interesting person. He wascontinuously, to the manifest annoyance of the others. Presently Dr. Cutler, leaning forward, addressed the swearer. Sir, he said, you areirst Newport visit, 1832, was also the terrible cholera year. Uncle Ben Cutler, at that time city missionary, writes in his diary:-- The cthirty deaths. Many parts of the city were entirely deserted. Dr. Cutler retained through life the vivid recollection of riding down Broad take the cholera? Answer: Because they have no bowels. Grandma Cutler was at Newport with the Wards and Francises, and trembled for her ond Street that we chiefly associate the sprightly figure of Grandma Cutler, who was a frequent visitor there. The affection between Mr. Ward s for Feltham's Resolves, a book little in demand in the twentieth century); and he was her saucy Lark, or Plato. Mrs. Cutler died in 1836.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
ater, when the eldest son, Samuel, returned from Europe, bringing with him a fine collection of books, Mr. Ward built a library specially for them. This was the house into which the family moved in 1835, Julia being then sixteen years of age; this was the house she loved, the memory of which was dear to her through all the years of her life. The family was at that time patriarchal in its dimensions: Mr. Ward and his six children, Dr. and Mrs. Francis and their four; often, too, Grandma Cutler and other Cutlers, not to speak of Wards, Greenes, and McAllisters. (Louisa, youngest of the Cutler sisters, one of the most beautiful and enchanting women of her time, was married to Matthew Hall McAllister.) One and all were sure of a welcome at The corner ; one and all were received with cordial urbanity, first by Johnson, the colored butler, later by Mr. Ward, the soul of dignified hospitality. Another inmate of the house during several years was Christy Evangelides, a Greek boy, orp