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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 19 3 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 10 2 Browse Search
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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
egin whipping! If Julia Ward was part Ward and Greene, she was quite as much Cutler and Marion; it is to this descent that we must turn for the best explanation ofd do no wrong. All this, and a host of tender associations beside, the name of Cutler meant to her; yet it may be questioned whether any of these characteristics wouhy citizen of Holland, who, coming to this country in 1674, changed his name to Cutler for conveniencea sake, had not one of these descendants, Benjamin Clarke CutlerBenjamin Clarke Cutler, married Sarah (Mitchell) Hyrne, daughter of Thomas Mitchell'and Esther (or Hester) Marion. To most people, the name of Marion suggests one person only,--General f the fifteen children with whom we have concern is Sarah Mitchell, the Grandma Cutler of Julia Ward's childhood. This lady was married at fourteen to Dr. Hyrne, an time, and four years after his death the twenty-year-old widow married Benjamin Clarke Cutler, then a widower, Sheriff of Norfolk County, Massachusetts, and third in
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
ul Aunt Eliza, known in the family as Auntie Francis. The young mother, in dying, had commended her children specially to the care of this, her eldest sister, whose ability had been tried and proved from childhood. In 1810 her father, Benjamin Clarke Cutler, died suddenly under singular and painful circumstances. Her mother, crushed by this event, took to her bed, leaving the care of the family to Eliza, then fifteen years of age. Eliza took up the house-mother's burden without question; nueded to bleed her, removing twelve ounces of blood; replying to her piteous protestations, Madam, I saw that you were on the point of apoplexy, and I judge it best to avert it. In strong contrast with Uncle Doctor was Uncle Ben, the Reverend Benjamin Clarke Cutler, for many years rector of St. Anne's Church, Brooklyn. This uncle was much less to Julia's taste: indeed, she was known to stamp her childish foot, and cry, I don't care for old Ben Cutler! Nevertheless he was a saintly and inter
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
no idea that I should so soon hear of it as a reality. What a chapter ends with him! August 15. To-day is mercifully cool. I have about finished my A. A.W. screed, D. G. The great heats have affected me very much; my brain has been full of fever fancies and of nonsense. I prayed earnestly this morning that I might not survive my wits. I have great hope that I shall not. ... August 17. Have read in Minot J. Savage's Four great questions, and in the long biography of my uncle, Rev. B. C. Cutler. His piety and faithfulness appear to me most edifying. His theology at the present time seems impossible. I am sorry that I saw so very little of him after my marriage, but he was disposed to consider me as one of the lost, and I could not have met him on any religious ground. I could do this better now, having learned something of the value which very erroneous opinions may have, when they serve, as in his case, to stimulate right effort and true feeling. To Laura Oak Glen,
Cuckson, Mr., II, 203. Cumberland Lakes, I, 92. Curiel, Seflor, I, 324. Curtis, G. W., I, 143, 159, 160; II, 93. Letter of, II, 147. Cushing, Mr., II, 74, 75. Cushing, Louisa, I, 227. Cushman, Charlotte, I, 204, I, 345. Cutler, B. C., Sr., I, 10, 13, 17. Cutler, B. C., 2d, I, 27, 28, 38, 39, 107; II, 222, 364. Cutler, Eliza, see Francis. Cutler, John, I, 10, 12. Cutler, Julia, see Ward. Cutler, Louisa, see McAllister. Cutler, Sarah M. H., I, 10, 12, 13, 17Cutler, B. C., 2d, I, 27, 28, 38, 39, 107; II, 222, 364. Cutler, Eliza, see Francis. Cutler, John, I, 10, 12. Cutler, Julia, see Ward. Cutler, Louisa, see McAllister. Cutler, Sarah M. H., I, 10, 12, 13, 17, 39, 40, 42; II, 319. Cyclades, I, 272. Cyprus, II, 42. Czerwinsk, II, 12, 13, 14. Dana, R. H., Jr., I, 226. D'Annunzio, II, 285. Dante, Alighieri, I, 174, 330; II, 26, 27, 120, 357. Dantzig, II, 15, 18. Daubigny, C. F., II, 172. Daughters of the American Revolution, I, 179, 194, 351. Davenport, E. L., I, 204. Davidson, Thomas, II, 128. Davidson, Wm., letter of, II, 390. Davis, James C., I, 201, 251. Davis, Jefferson, I, 222. Davis, Mary F., I, 304.
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 1: birth, parentage, childhood (search)
aid to have been due in large measure to the fatigue caused by his incessant labors in behalf of his country. Although he did not live to sign the Declaration of Independence, he was one of the first men to prophesy the separation of the colonies from the mother country. married to a daughter of Governor Greene, of the same state. My mother was grandniece to General Francis Marion, of Huguenot descent, known in the Revolution as the Swamp-fox of southern campaigns. Her father was Benjamin Clarke Cutler, whose first ancestor in this country was John De Mesmekir, of Holland. Let me here remark that an expert in chiromancy, after making a recent examination of my hand, exclaimed, You inherit military blood; your hand shows it. My own earliest recollections are of a fine house on the Bowling Green, a region of high fashion in those days. In the summer mornings my nurse sometimes walked abroad with me, and showed me the young girls of our neighborhood, engaged with their skipping
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 3: New York society (search)
come on from New York for the ceremony, said to her later in the evening, Dear mamma, you must make a present of that gown to some theatrical friend. It is only fit for the boards. The officiating clergyman of the occasion was the Reverend Benjamin Clarke Cutler, brother of the bride. It was his first service of the kind, and the company were somewhat amused when, in absence or confusion of mind, he pronounced the nuptial blessing upon M and N, the letters which stand in the church rituale had received a good musical education for those times, and Colonel Perkins of Boston once told me that he remembered her as a fascinating young widow with a lovely voice. It must have been during her visit to Boston that she met my grandfather Cutler, who straightway fell in love with and married her. When past her sixtieth year she would sometimes sing an old-time duet with my father. She had a great love of good literature. Here is what she told me about the fashions of her youth: We w
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
rt, 238; presides at the Unitarian anniversary in 1886, 302; advocates woman suffrage, 378. Cushing, Caleb, 180. Cushman, Miss, Charlotte, 240. Cutler, Benjamin Clarke, Mrs. Howe's grandfather, 4. Cutler, Rev. Benjamin Clarke (son of the preceding), officiates at his sister's wedding, 34. Cutler, Mrs. Benjamin Clarke; Cutler, Rev. Benjamin Clarke (son of the preceding), officiates at his sister's wedding, 34. Cutler, Mrs. Benjamin Clarke; Mrs. Howe's grandmother, her costume at her daughter Louisa's wedding, 34; her beauty and charm, 35; describes the dress of her younger days, 35, 36. Cutler, Eliza. See Francis, Mrs. John W. Cutler, Louisa Corde. See McAllister, Mrs. Julian. Daggett, Mrs., Kate Newell, third president of the Association for the AdvancemenCutler, Mrs. Benjamin Clarke; Mrs. Howe's grandmother, her costume at her daughter Louisa's wedding, 34; her beauty and charm, 35; describes the dress of her younger days, 35, 36. Cutler, Eliza. See Francis, Mrs. John W. Cutler, Louisa Corde. See McAllister, Mrs. Julian. Daggett, Mrs., Kate Newell, third president of the Association for the Advancement of Women, 393. Dana, Richard H., the elder, a visitor at the Ward home, 79; a kind of transcendentalist, 428. Danforth, Elizabeth, describes Louisa Cutler's wedding, 33, 34. Dante, his works read, 206. Da Ponte, Lorenzo, teacher of Italian in New York, his earlier career, 24. Da Ponte, Lorenzo (son of preceding),t