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dsworth's, Doubleday's, and Robinson's. Wadsworth's (composed of Meredith's and Cutler's brigades — both mainly Western troops) had the advance, with Cutler on the riCutler on the right and Meredith on the left. Arriving at the Theological Seminary, above the town, the near presence of the enemy became manifest, and they placed a battery in posiime to wait for orders from the new corps commander; instantly, right and left, Cutler and Meredith wheeled into line of battle on the double-quick. Well-tried troopans all, and well mated with the brave New-Yorkers whom Wadsworth also led. Cutler, having the advance, opened the attack; Meredith was at it a few minutes later.that followed as the most terrific they have ever known. In a single brigade, (Cutler's,) in twenty minutes, every staff-officer had his horse shot under him, some o grim mockery of war there sought to outdo itself — had his tail shot off! General Cutler himself had three horses shot under him. Few troops could stand it. All
ies to sustain the cause of the Union. Permit us, then, in this spirit, to ask your Excellency to reexamine the grave subjects we have considered, to the end that on your retirement from the high position you occupy, you may leave behind you no doctrines and no further precedents of despotic power to prevent you and your posterity from enjoying that constitutional liberty which is the inheritance of us all, and to the end, also, that history may speak of your administration with indulgence, if it cannot with approval. We are, sir, with great respect, yours very truly, John V. L. Pruyn, Chairman of Committees. James Kidd, Gilber C. Davidson, J. V. P. Quackenbush, Wm. A. Fassett, O. M. Hungerford, John Hogan, Henry Lansing, S. Hand, M. K. Cohen, John Cutler, C. Van Benthuysen, George H. Thacher, C. W. Armstrong, William Doyle, Franklin Townsend, Wm. Appleton, B. R. Spilman, James McKown, A. H. Tremain, Daniel Shaw, W. Simon, A. E. Stimson, Isaac Lederer. Albany, June 30, 1863.
rown out along the river-bank as skirmishers, whilst the Eighth was also dismounted, and ordered to support the battery, which had only four short-range guns, and the enemy opened on us with some twenty pieces of artillery, but our troops gallantly held the ground for several hours, repulsing the charges of the enemy, and gradually fell back on the Fayetteville road, the enemy following, but keeping at a respectable distance. Colonel Gregg had but two aids with him--Lieutenants Martin and Cutler--and both were wounded; the former severely and the latter slightly. Lieutenant Adams, Fourth Pennsylvania; Major Wilson, Eighth Pennsylvania; Lieutenant-Colonel Kettler, First New-Jersey; Major Russell, First Maryland, were wounded; and the loss of the Second brigade, it is thought, will amount to about four hundred and fifty men in killed, wounded, and missing, the Fourth and Thirteenth Pennsylvania regiments suffering most severely. Colonel Gregg is highly spoken of for the manner in
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
ohn Demesmaker, On first coming to this country, Johannes Demesmaker settled in Hingham, Massachusetts. Later he moved to Boston, where he became known as Dr. John Cutler; married Mary Cowell, of Boston, and served as surgeon in King Philip's War. before mentioned, sometime physician and surgeon. Our mother was much attached to Grandma Cutler, and speaks thus of her in a sketch entitled The Elegant literature of sixty years ago : Grandma will read Owen Feltham's Resolves, albeit the print is too small for her eyes. She knows Pope and Crabbe by heart, admires Shenstone, and tells me which scenes are considered finest in this or that of Scott's novels. Calling one day upon a compeer of her own age, she was scandalized to find her occupied with a silly story called Jimmy Jessamy. Mrs. Cutler had known General Washington, and was fond of telling how at a ball the Commander-in-Chief crossed the room to speak to her. Many of her letters have been preserved, and show a sprightli
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
Mr. Ward's activities were not confined to financial affairs. He was founder and first president of the Bank of Commerce; one of the founders of the New York University and of the Stuyvesant Institute, etc., etc. In 1812 he married Julia Rush Cutler, second daughter of Benjamin Clarke and Sarah Mitchell (Hyrne) Cutler. Julia Cutler was sixteen years old at the time of her marriage, lovely in character and beautiful in person. She had been a pupil of the saintly Isabella Graham, and her litCutler. Julia Cutler was sixteen years old at the time of her marriage, lovely in character and beautiful in person. She had been a pupil of the saintly Isabella Graham, and her literary taste had been carefully cultivated in the style of the day. One of her poems, found in Griswold's Female Poets of America, shows the deeply religious cast of her mind; yet she was full of gentle gayety, loved music, laughter, and pretty things. During the first years of their married life, Mr. and Mrs. Ward lived in Marketfield Street, near the Battery. Here four children were born, Samuel and Henry, and the two Julias. She who was known as the first little Julia lived only four year
II, 189. Critic, N. Y., II, 66. Crothers, S. McC., II, 320. Crusaders, II, 15. Cuba, I, 173, 176, 177, 326. Cuckson, Mr., II, 203. Cumberland Lakes, I, 92. Curiel, Seflor, I, 324. Curtis, G. W., I, 143, 159, 160; II, 93. Letter of, II, 147. Cushing, Mr., II, 74, 75. Cushing, Louisa, I, 227. Cushman, Charlotte, I, 204, I, 345. Cutler, B. C., Sr., I, 10, 13, 17. Cutler, B. C., 2d, I, 27, 28, 38, 39, 107; II, 222, 364. Cutler, Eliza, see Francis. Cutler, John, I, 10, 12. Cutler, Julia, see Ward. Cutler, Louisa, see McAllister. Cutler, Sarah M. H., I, 10, 12, 13, 17, 39, 40, 42; II, 319. Cyclades, I, 272. Cyprus, II, 42. Czerwinsk, II, 12, 13, 14. Dana, R. H., Jr., I, 226. D'Annunzio, II, 285. Dante, Alighieri, I, 174, 330; II, 26, 27, 120, 357. Dantzig, II, 15, 18. Daubigny, C. F., II, 172. Daughters of the American Revolution, I, 179, 194, 351. Davenport, E. L., I, 204. Davidson, Thomas, II, 128.
bounds and ours, as far as to Rocky Meadow; with gates to the highways from Concord to Watertown and from Cambridge to Watertown. Feb. 14, 1675-6. William Maning, and Nathaniell Hancocke, and John Jackson, and John Gove, are appointed by the Selectmen, to have inspection into families, that there be no bye drinking, or any misdemeanour, whereby sin is committed, and persons from their houses unseasonably. The selectmen of Cambridge plaintiffs against Capt. Lawrence Hammond and John Cutler, jun., defendants, do humbly declare as followeth, &c. In the year 1634 the General Court granted them liberty to erect a ware upon Minottomy River, and they accordingly so did, and have had quiet possession of the same from that time until now, without any disturbance of their neighbors of Charlestown or any other; and hath been in a manner the stay and support of the town by fishing their Indian corn, which is the principal part of their husbandry and livelihood. But this last spring the
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Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Charlestown School in the 17th century. (search)
r on. Taking up, in chronological order, the various references to the school during the Phipps regime, we learn somewhat of the school fund and of the disciplining of the schoolboys. January 4, 1875. ‘Voted that Lotts forfeited to ye Towne be given to a free schoole in Charlestown forever.’ The same day it was ‘agreed that Lovell's Island should be & remain to the use of the school in Charlestown forever, and not to be alienated from it to any other use.’ January 17, 1675-6. John Cutler, Jr., one of the constables, was thus instructed: That you allow no boys to sit in any other place in ye meeting house but those appointed for therein, viz., the boys' seats in ye long benches in ye southwest alley, and therefore that you fetch them out of the galleries & from before the Pulpit or elsewhere, & place them in ye place above said. That you endeavor to prevent playing & all irrelevant carriage in time of Worship. That you prevent there unnecessary frequent running o
n of a portion of the common made in 1681, and the proprietors thereof drew lots for their shares. Captain Timothy Wheeler drew lot No. 40. He was entitled to eight cow commons, and, therefore, twelve acres were set off to him. This was a parcel of forty rods frontage on Barberry Lane, and forty-eight rods frontage on School Street. Its opposite sides were equal. By deed dated July 9, 1683, Captain Wheeler for £ 55 lawful money of the colony of Massachusetts paid by William Stetson, John Cutler, and Aaron Ludkin, Deacons and Trustees for the Church of Charlestown, conveyed the whole twelve acres to said deacons and trustees. This £ 55 was a gift from Captain Richard Sprague and his wife, Mary. This was the Richard Sprague who was called Leffttenant, and with whom, February 15, 1662, the proprietors of the stinted common made an agreement whereby, for the use of twenty cow commons for twenty-one years, he agreed to erect and maintain a fence between the common and Mr. Winthro
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