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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 13 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 8 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for A. S. Cutts or search for A. S. Cutts in all documents.

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airfax on the 27th, and at Annandale, December 2d. Gen. S. G. French, stationed at Evansport, reported on December 15th that his position had been under fire from Federal batteries on the Maryland shore during the past three weeks. On December 20th Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, with a force comprising the Eleventh Virginia, Col. Samuel Garland; Sixth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest; Tenth Alabama, Col. J. H. Forney, and First Kentucky, Col. T. H. Taylor, in all 1,600 infantry; Capt. A. S. Cutts' Georgia artillery (four pieces), Maj. J. B. Gordon's North Carolina cavalry, and Capt. A. L. Pitzer's Virginia cavalry, moved toward Dranesville for the purpose of protecting an expedition of army wagons after hay. At the same time a Federal expedition approached Dranesville, on a similar mission. Upon discovering the presence of the enemy, Stuart sent Pitzer to keep between them and the wagons, and order the latter back, while the main body was disposed for a vigorous attack upon t
won; but when Gordon and Walker reinforced the attack on his flanks, he was compelled to retire with heavy loss Ewell's guns, raking the front with furious fire, had prevented all attempts to reinforce the gallant Upton. The Confederate right, under Early, was also attacked, several times, during the 10th, by Burnside's corps, on the Fredericksburg road. There the Confederate artillery had full play on the Federal lines, as they essayed to cross the broad fields in front, and Pegram and Cutts, with their big guns, easily repulsed all of Burnside's attacks. Gen. F. A. Walker, commenting on Grant's tactics, writes: To assault all along the line, as was often done in the summer of 1864, is the very abdication of leadership. At 8:30 of the 11th, Grant dispatched to Halleck: We have now ended the sixth day of very heavy fighting, the result to this time in our favor. But our losses have been heavy, as well as those of the enemy. We have lost to this time eleven general offic