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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 13 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 8 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for A. S. Cutts or search for A. S. Cutts in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Dranesville, Va. (search)
his camp at Centreville nearly all the wagons of his army into upper Fairfax and lower Loudoun to gather much needed supplies. The protection of this wagon train was entrusted to Colonel J. E. B. Stuart, who afterwards immortalized himself as the Prince Rupert of the South. As a guard for the wagons he had under his command four regiments of infantry—the 10th Alabama, 6th South Carolina, 11th Virginia, 1st Kentucky; one battery of four guns, the Sumter Flying Artillery, of Georgia, Captain A. S. Cutts, and about 150 cavalry. The two combatants, thus unexpectedly fronting one another, were both seized with consternation. Ord came to the conclusion that the Confederate force in his front had been sent out to intercept his retreat to camp and capture his command. Stuart, on the other hand, could only interpret the presence of such a large body of the enemy as an attempt of the Federals to capture his wagons and forage. He fully realized the danger of his position, as his wagon