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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cuyler or search for Cuyler in all documents.

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n the road and bridge, to make them passable, much was still required to keep them in condition; and it was not until daylight, the ninth, that the rear of the column had completed the crossing. During the eighth, the enemy's cavalry made several attempts to drive in our rear pickets, but did not succeed. The loss on our side during these attacks was but slight, although at times the skirmishing was quite animated. On the morning of the ninth, marched from camp, at Ebenezer Church, to Cuyler's plantation, where General Morgan, who was in the advance, found the enemy occupying a strongly-erected field-work, disposed to dispute his advance. General Morgan immediately placed a couple of field-pieces in position, and opened fire upon the work. His infantry was soon deployed for an attack, but the near approach of night, and the impossibility of assaulting the position, through the impassable swamp in our front, caused me to defer the attack until morning; when it was discovered th
er Creek, where, after a delay of several hours for completion of pontoons, moved forward to Cyler's Creek; just after going into camps, received orders from General Davis to return to Little Ebenezer to protect the train of the corps, an attack being apprehended; returned, and the Second and Third brigades, recrossing the creek, bivouacked for the night, having marched (10) ten miles. December ninth, left camp at seven A. M., marching eight miles, (and constructing three bridges.) At Doctor Cuyler's plantation, about fourteen and a half miles from Savannah, my advance came within range and fire of a rebel battery. Two regiments of the Third brigade were at once deployed as skirmishers on the right and left of the road, and one piece of the battery ordered forward; this piece was soon in position and opened fire, which was spiritedly answered by some, well-directed shots. Lieutenant Coe, commanding battery, was struck by a shell and instantly killed — a brave, good officer. By o