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bout two o'clock, perhaps a little later, by the order of Col. Ford, the Heights were abandoned, the guns being spiked according to instructions. On Sunday, Col. D'Utassy sent over to Maryland Heights four companies under Major Wood, who brought off, without opposition, four brass twelve-pounders, two of which were imperfectly sed shelling them for several hours. The line of battle was formed on the breastworks behind the Bolivar Heights, nearly as it had been the day before, namely, Col. D'Utassy occupied the extreme right with his brigade, consisting of the Sixty-fifth Illinois, One Hundred and Eleventh, One Hundred and Fifteenth, and Thirty-ninth New-Maryland, evidently with the design of capturing this place. Are we to be left to our fate? A few minutes after eight a council of war was held. The brave Col. D'Utassy, for one, voted never to surrender, and requested that he might have the privilege of cutting his way out. White flags were run up in every direction, and a fl
bout two o'clock, perhaps a little later, by the order of Col. Ford, the Heights were abandoned, the guns being spiked according to instructions. On Sunday, Col. D'Utassy sent over to Maryland Heights four companies under Major Wood, who brought off, without opposition, four brass twelve-pounders, two of which were imperfectly sed shelling them for several hours. The line of battle was formed on the breastworks behind the Bolivar Heights, nearly as it had been the day before, namely, Col. D'Utassy occupied the extreme right with his brigade, consisting of the Sixty-fifth Illinois, One Hundred and Eleventh, One Hundred and Fifteenth, and Thirty-ninth New-Maryland, evidently with the design of capturing this place. Are we to be left to our fate? A few minutes after eight a council of war was held. The brave Col. D'Utassy, for one, voted never to surrender, and requested that he might have the privilege of cutting his way out. White flags were run up in every direction, and a fl