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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 8 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. L. Dabney or search for R. L. Dabney in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
e militia which he had assembled in the district itself to about 11,000 men. Dabney's Life of Jackson, page 257. The greater part of General Loring's force did noternor Letcher and General J. E. Johnston, See Johnston's Narrative, page 88; Dabney's Life, page 278, &c. he withdrew the resignation. Subsequently, there was no o General Johnston, and meantime they united in a vigorous pursuit of Banks. Dabney's Life of Jackson, page 359. Ashby has followed close on Banks' heels, and avalry), and his entire force, which was all with him, was about 16,000 men. Dabney's Life, page 364. Major Dabney was at this time Chief-of-Staff to General JacksMajor Dabney was at this time Chief-of-Staff to General Jackson. This dispatch shows, however, that Jackson was for the time not only occupying all the troops in and around Washington, together with Fremont's forces, but was in succession the next day, with the hope of overwhelming them separately. Dabney's Life. For this purpose he directed that during the night a temporary bridge,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
pector-General, and Lieutenant G. M. Ryals, C. S. A., Provost-Marshal, deserve my special gratitude and praise. The same qualities, united to a thorough knowledge of much of the country, are ascribable to Captain B. S. White, C. S. A., who, though still suffering from a severe wound received at Fleetwood, accompanied the command, and his services proclaim him an officer of merit and distinction. Chief Surgeon Eliason, Captain Blackford, Engineers; Captain Cooke, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-Camp; Assistant Engineer F. G. Robertson, and Cadet Hullihen, C. S. A., and Lieutenant H. Hagan, Virginia provisional army, all performed their duties with commendable zeal and credit. Major Fitzhugh, Chief, and Captain J. M. Hanger, Assistant Quartermaster, and Major W. J. Johnson, Chief Commissary, discharged their arduous duties in their usually highly creditable manner. First Lieutenant R. B. Kennon, P. A. C. S., temporarily attached, on two different occasions was en
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
for the cavalry. We pushed on to Harrisonburg, and followed the enemy towards New Market, capturing many stragglers, wagons, horses and plunder, abandoned by the enemy. The following dispatches from General Jackson will explain themselves. Major Dabney and Major John E. Cooke have commented upon what happened. These papers will show that the cavalry did efficient service, and had the confidence of General Jackson. How, I may explain in another letter. When General Jackson left the Valley ding officer should also be instructed to use all care to prevent escape of prisoners, and to this end should see that his guard was adequately supplied with fire-arms and ammunition before it sets out. Respectfully, your obedient servant, R. L. Dabney, Assistant Adjutant-General. near Mount Meridian, June 13th, 1862. Colonel — Yours of this date has been received. I have given the Chief Commissary of Subsistence orders to supply the hospital near Harrisonburg with subsistence. Do no
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
ned by law so as to give more for defence. The women of Fredericksburg, equally as patriotic, obeyed without a murmur, and bore their proportion of the burdens of the hour, for the confirmation of which they have the recorded words of Robert E. Lee. On the 22d November, one day after the demand for the surrender of Fredericksburg, Stonewall Jackson began his march from Winchester, and in eight days transferred his corps, with an interval of two days rest, to the vicinity of Fredericksburg (Dabney, page 594). The first of December found the Confederate army united. It was Burnside's intention to cross the Rappahannock at once upon the arrival of his army, but the delay in receiving his pontoons prevented the movement — they did not reach him until the 22d or 23d of November. Could he have done so, Longstreet's corps only would have been in his front, as Jackson did not arrive until the 30th. It is certain, however, he would have encountered the united Confederate army somewhere