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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 8 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. L. Dabney or search for R. L. Dabney in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
now. Stonewall Jackson. A lecture delivered in Baltimore, in November, 1872, by Rev. Dr. R. L. Dabney. [Anything from the able pen of Dr. Dabney concerning Stonewall Jackson would be readDr. Dabney concerning Stonewall Jackson would be read with interest. His position as Chief of Staff, his intimate personal relations with the great chieftain, and his study of his character and his campaigns when acting as his chosen biographer, peculiarly fit Dr. Dabney to tell the story of Jackson's life, or to delineate his character. We are confident, therefore, that our readers will thank us for giving them the following paper, even though thtamps. Stonewall Jackson. A lecture delivered in Baltimore in November, 1872, by Rev. Dr. R. L. Dabney. paper no. 2. (Conclusion.) This plan, then, is clear even to the civic apprehensionpon his saddle towards me and said, with a smile which yet had a serious meaning in it: Stop, Major Dabney; you will make me low-spirited! He then rode in silence for some moments, and said, as thou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
Stonewall Jackson. A lecture delivered in Baltimore, in November, 1872, by Rev. Dr. R. L. Dabney. [Anything from the able pen of Dr. Dabney concerning Stonewall Jackson would be read with interest. His position as Chief of Staff, his intimate personal relations with the great chieftain, and his study of his character and hDr. Dabney concerning Stonewall Jackson would be read with interest. His position as Chief of Staff, his intimate personal relations with the great chieftain, and his study of his character and his campaigns when acting as his chosen biographer, peculiarly fit Dr. Dabney to tell the story of Jackson's life, or to delineate his character. We are confident, therefore, that our readers will thank us for giving them the following paper, even though there may be dissent from some of the views presented. We print it just as iDr. Dabney to tell the story of Jackson's life, or to delineate his character. We are confident, therefore, that our readers will thank us for giving them the following paper, even though there may be dissent from some of the views presented. We print it just as it was orignally delivered, only regretting that we are compelled by the press upon our pages to divide it into two parts.] I am expected to speak to-night of Stonewall Jackson. The subject sounds remote, antiquated, in these last days. How seldom does that name, once on every tongue, mix itself now-a-days, with the current sp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
Stonewall Jackson. A lecture delivered in Baltimore in November, 1872, by Rev. Dr. R. L. Dabney. paper no. 2. (Conclusion.) This plan, then, is clear even to the civic apprehension, as offering fewest risks and largest promise—in a word, the perfection of sagacity; and with so many men in gray as might match two-fold numbers of enemies (odds rather favorable, if not light and trivial, compared with the customary), it seems to promise safely. Perhaps some may even say that these reaso resistance by gradual attrition, which would render all our victories unavailing. At length, as I enlarged upon the points, Jackson turned himself upon his saddle towards me and said, with a smile which yet had a serious meaning in it: Stop, Major Dabney; you will make me low-spirited! He then rode in silence for some moments, and said, as though to himself: I don't profess any romantic indifference to life; and certainly, in my own private relations, I have as much that is dear to wish to l