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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 8 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. L. Dabney or search for R. L. Dabney in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
d. Every road leading in the direction of the Federal army was watched by the Confederate cavalry. The troops moved as men will move when they are impelled by enthusiasm. Their eyes sparkled, their expression was ardent, and their step elastic. They seemed to have been lifted out of the obscurity of their lives into a higher plane of glorious achievements. He tells of that scene, which, no doubt, all of you who were there will remember, and which has been so well described, too, by Professor Dabney in his Life of Jackson, when Jackson stood by the road side to see us all pass as the evening of the first day's march closed in. He says: Near the end of the day's march General Jackson rode to the head of his column. There, on a great stone, he stood gazing as his soldiers passed. It was sunset. His face was darkened by exposure; his uniform was soiled and dingy, but his figure was rigid, and his expression, though stern, was radiant with hope. Before him passed in review hi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), George W. Cable in the Century Magazine. (search)
George W. Cable in the Century Magazine. A Review by Rev. R. L. Dabney, D. D., Ll.D. [Not a few of us have been heartily disgusted with the cringing, crawling, dirt-eating spirit shown by Mr. Cable and some of his satellites, and we feel sure that the following review from the trenchant pen of Stonewall Jackson's old Adjutant-General will be keenly enjoyed and heartily endorsed by our Southern people generally:] Mr. McKay justly reminds Mr. Cable that it is not true all we of the South went to war in 1861 without justly knowing what we did it for, for which we thank Mr. McKay. We wish to add, that if Mr. Cable chooses thus to condemn himself, we beg to be excused from sharing his confession. We are very sure that, unlike him, we did know what we were about. In a later number of the Century Magazine he replies to Mr. McKay, and his reply makes matters infinitely worse. He thinks the reserved rights of the States were a quibble, and even if for argument's sake, we concede th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
I have always contended that General Lee had less than 27,000 infantry and artillery in the battle of Sharpsburg. He crossed the Potomac with nine divisions. As mine had not been in the Pope campaign and had therefore suffered less than the other eight from battle, disease and fatigue, I supposed it to be one of the very largest, and yet it had but little over 3,000 men in it at Sharpsburg. As nine times 3,000 gives 27,000, I thought that 27,000 was the maximum number in Lee's army. Dr. Dabney, a very careful statistician, puts Lee's strength at 33,000 including the cavalry. My estimate, which I have had to reduce, was of infantry and artillery alone. On page 813 of this Volume XIII, I find Lee's losses in killed and wounded in the Maryland campaign to have been 10,291, of which, my division is credited with 2,902 or 28.19 per cent. of the whole. It is not reasonable to suppose that this division should sustain more than one-fourth of the entire loss of the army, if its str
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid against Richmond. (search)
ut getting closer to the city than any of our troops ever did up to the day of the surrender. Our column was then turned east, and we came round and crossed the railroad at Hungary Station, from there to the Brooke pike, and finding from a citizen that Kilpatrick was in retreat down the Peninsula, he determined to cross through King William county and King and Queen county, and try and reach Butler's lines at Gloucester Point. We crossed the Pamunkey at Hanovertown Ferry. The Mattaponi at Dabney's (Walkerton) Ferry, having at this place a little skirmish with bushwhackers. I would here state that coming round the city part of our column got separated from the advance, and never got with us again, but, by good fortune, got in with Kilpatrick's forces and escaped. We were not so fortunate. When daylight came, we had Colonel Dahlgren, Major Cook, Lieutenant Merrit and myself, commissioned officers, and seventy-five men, besides about fifty contrabands and a number of extra horses.