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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 13 Browse Search
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dian to sundown. Sept. 7 Night attack on Moultrie.152241,200Fort MoultrieThese hits were from Sullivan's Island batteries; at anchor. Sept. 8483701,200Fort Moultrie Respectfully submitted, S. C. Rowan, Commodore, commanding. Report of Lieut.-Commander E. Simpson. United States iron-clad Passaic, off Morris Island, S. C., April 21, 1864. Sir: In the Army and Navy Journal, of the sixteenth instant, there is published a review of the service of the monitors, by Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren. As this review does not give this vessel credit for the service performed by her, I respectfully ask your attention to the subject, in order that the statement may be corrected at the Navy Department. On the twenty-ninth of July, 1863, this vessel went into action with Fort Wagner, followed by the Patapsco; the New Ironsides joined in the action also. The presence of the Passaic in this action is not mentioned in the review. On the thirty-first of August, 1863, the most s
ountry, and have rendered them invaluable in conducting operations in this quarter. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Instructions from Lieut.-Com. E. E. Stone. United States steaut your instructions to your entire satisfaction, I remain respectfully, Your obedient servant, Edward E. Stone, Lieutenant-Commander U. S. Navy. Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, Port Royal Harbor, S. C. Report of Lieut.-Com. J. C. Chaplin. United States steamer Dai-Ching, Saint Helena Soun been gotten off; at all events, the horses might have been saved, as the Plato was alongside of her for some time before she was set on fire, and not a shot fired at them by the rebels. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. C. Chaplin, Lieutenant-Commander. Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron.
Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Ho Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Hoh, Commander, and Senior Officer present. Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron off Charleston, S. C. Report of rear-admiral J. A. Dahlgren. flag-steamer Philadelphia, off Morris Island, June 1e, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. HoB. Balch, Commander, United States Navy. Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron off Charlese, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Honborn, Acting Ensign, United States Navy. Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, Port Royalnborn, Acting Ensign, United States Navy. Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, Com'dg S. A. B. Squadron, Port Royal Har
o be the same ones we had landed in the morning. I manned two boats, and went on shore to see what assistance was required. On landing, the Colonel told me he had four wounded men and four prisoners, and said he had no way of caring for the wounded, and no way of keeping his prisoners, and wished me to receive them on board this vessel until they could be properly cared for, which I did. They were all put on board the Mt. Washington last evening, and sent down. He had also a twelve-pound Dahlgren howitzer, which he had found in the house, and which he said he should leave, as he had no way of taking it with him. I then took it and brought it on board, where I still have it. It is complete, with the exception of sights. At ten P. M. last night the John D. W. Pentz came up after the troops, and requested of me some boats to help reembark them, which I sent. They were all got off at 3.30 this morning, and immediately started down the river. I remained there until I received your ord
ns of the heaviest calibres ever used in war, to wit: Fifteen and. eleven-inch Dahlgren guns, and eight-inch rifle pieces. The Weehawken in advance, provided with a anchors in the shallow water off Morris Island. Her armament, two eleven-inch Dahlgren guns, two United States flags, two pennants and three signal flags, have sinceieutenant W. T. Glassell, C. S. N. The more material trophies, two eleven-inch Dahlgren pieces, now in battery, were recovered, under the supervision of General Riplet, rifle.bolts, rifle.Tubes.powder. 10-inch Columbiad.8-inch Columbiad.9-inch Dahlgren.32-pounder.10-inch Mortar.8-inch Columbiad, Incendiary.7-inch Brooke.42-poundeot  2  7 shells93 Cummins' Point, 65 shots.110-in. ColumbiadShot37 19-in. DahlgrenShells28 Battery Wagner, 26 shots.132-pounder RifleShells9 124-pounder RifleSwounded. The fort was seriously injured on the north-west face; one nine-inch Dahlgren gun, three forty-two-pounders and one eight-inch columbiad disabled. During t