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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 197 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 31 1 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 31 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John A. Dahlgren or search for John A. Dahlgren in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
. R. Osgood & Co., Boston, have sent us a copy of their beautifully gotten up memoir of Admiral John A. Dahlgren, by his widow, Mrs. M. V. Dahlgren. The book is largely autobiographical, as it quotected. The battery consisted of ten guns, four single-banded Brooke rifles and six nine-inch Dahlgren's shell guns. Two of the rifles, bow and stern pivots, were seven-inch, of 14,500 pounds; the of essential service to us. On this occasion the following dispatch from General Gilmore to Admiral Dahlgren had been intercepted, and in General Beauregard's possession hours before the assault: Contme elapsed, however, before these changes were completed, and I am unable to understand why Admiral Dahlgren did not meanwhile avail himself of the opening thus offered and push with his iron-clads fond and naval forces, that two independent expeditions were organized for this attack-one by Admiral Dahlgren, the other by General Gilmore. The report says: The only arrangement for concert of action
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
s for this admirable edition of a book which has long been noted for its real ability, and whose author President Davis justly pronounces the fairest and most careful of the Northern writers on the war. We expect to have hereafter a full review of the book, and to point out some very serious errors into which the author has fallen; but meantime we advise our friends to buy the book. The publishers, J. R. Osgood & Co., Boston, have sent us a copy of their beautifully gotten up memoir of Admiral John A. Dahlgren, by his widow, Mrs. M. V. Dahlgren. The book is largely autobiographical, as it quotes fully from the diaries, letters, etc., of the distinguished Admiral, and touches on many matters of deepest interest, and historic importance, to which we shall hereafter give attention. The Bivouac, Louisville, Ky., for December, is an interesting and valuable number, and we again commend it as worthy of a wide circulation. We thank the editors for kindly reference to our Papers.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
Joints were broken where there were more than two courses. The hull, extending two feet below the roof, was plated with one inch iron; it was intended that it should have had three inches. The prow was of cast iron, wedge-shape, and weighed 1,500 pounds. It was about two feet under water, and projected two feet from the stem; it was not well fastened. The rudder and propeller were unprotected. The battery consisted of ten guns, four single-banded Brooke rifles and six nine-inch Dahlgren's shell guns. Two of the rifles, bow and stern pivots, were seven-inch, of 14,500 pounds; the other two were 6.4-inch (32 pounds calibre), of 9,000 pounds, one on each broadside. The nine-inch gun on each side nearest the furnaces was fitted for firing hot shot. A few nine-inch shot with extra windage were cast for hot shot. No other solid shot were on board during the fight. The engines were the same the vessel had whilst in the United States Navy. They were radically defective, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
eral prisoner. More than once the knowledge thus acquired proved of essential service to us. On this occasion the following dispatch from General Gilmore to Admiral Dahlgren had been intercepted, and in General Beauregard's possession hours before the assault: Continue the bombardment throughout the day; at sunset redouble it. Thchannel face, in which the new battery was placed. Some little time elapsed, however, before these changes were completed, and I am unable to understand why Admiral Dahlgren did not meanwhile avail himself of the opening thus offered and push with his iron-clads for the inner harbor. We certainly looked for such a dash, and Genelmore's report, as an evidence of a want of harmony between the land and naval forces, that two independent expeditions were organized for this attack-one by Admiral Dahlgren, the other by General Gilmore. The report says: The only arrangement for concert of action between the two parties, that were finally made, were intended si