Your search returned 84 results in 49 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 1: the situation. (search)
9,000 killed and wounded given above the 6000 more lost in the various operations around Petersburg up to March 28, 1865, and counting the missing at the moderate number of 10,000 for this period, we have the aggregate of 75,000 men cut down in the Army of the Potomac to mark the character of the service and the cost of the campaign thus far. If any minds demanding exactitude are troubled at the slight discrepancies in these reports, they may find relief in a passage in the Report of Surgeon Dalton, Chief Medical Officer of Field Hospitals for this campaign. He says of his experience with the treatment of disabled men in the field: It is impossible to convey an accurate idea of the number of sick and wounded who have received attention in this hospital,--that following the army. Hundreds passed through under circumstances which rendered it impossible to register their names or even accurately estimate their numbers. So unremitting were the calls for professional duty durin
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Andersonville-capture of Atlanta (search)
be prepared for this very campaign. It is hardly necessary to say they were not returned. That department continued to absorb troops to no purpose to the end of the war. This left McPherson so weak that the part of the plan above indicated had to be changed. He was therefore brought up to Chattanooga and moved from there on a road to the right of Thomas — the two coming together about Dalton. The three armies were abreast, all ready to start promptly on time. Sherman soon found that Dalton was so strongly fortified that it was useless to make any attempt to carry it by assault; and even to carry it by regular approaches was impracticable. There was a narrowing up in the mountain, between the National and Confederate armies, through which a stream, a wagon road and a railroad ran. Besides, the stream had been dammed so that the valley was a lake. Through this gorge the troops would have to pass. McPherson was therefore sent around by the right, to come out by the way of Snak
f June, the Army at Adairsville exhibits, with the addition of ten thousand one hundred and thirty-nine (10,139) cavalry, an effective total of sixty-six thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine (66,939), to which should be added three thousand three hundred and eighty-eight (3388) killed and wounded near Dalton and Resaca, and this second summary shows an effective total of seventy thousand three hundred and twenty-seven (70,327), exclusive of stragglers, deserters, and prisoners captured from Dalton to Adairsville. The foregoing summary fully tallies with the first, and we find, when only four days out from Dalton, over seventy thousand effectives, exclusive of deserters, stragglers, and prisoners captured. It cannot be asserted with any degree of reason that it was not feasible to have remained longer at Dalton, inasmuch as General Johnston had only to fortify Mill Creek and Snake Creek Gaps to insure his safety, and sufficient time to receive all the reinforcements then en route
nia Railroad, and a withdrawal by that route if necessary. Brig. Gens. C. L. Stevenson and S. M. Barton have already been ordered to report to you for duty. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant T. A. Washington, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, March 31, 1862. Brig. Gen. S. B. Maxey, Commanding, &c., Chattanooga, Tenn.: General: I am directed by Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith to say that he has telegraphed to Dalton for one unarmed regiment to re-enforce you at Chattanooga. Arms for them will be on their way here before this reaches you. The Fifth Georgia Regiment has been ordered from this post to your command. If Dowd's (Twenty-fourth Mississippi) regiment from Florida arrived at Chattanooga detain it there. Telegraph General Johnston the condition of affairs. He (General Smith) has sent you all the disposable force. Arms are on the way from Richmond for all the Georgia regiments at Dalton,
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 9 (search)
ience in Mississippi was, that impressed negroes run away whenever it is possible, and are frequently encouraged by their masters to do so; and I never knew one to be returned by his master. I respectfully suggest the division of this army into three corps, and, should your Excellency adopt that suggestion, the appointment of lieutenant-generals from some other army. Very respectfully, J. E. Johnston. I supposed, from the information given me by the ranking general officers, that Dalton had not been selected by General Bragg for its value as a defensive position, but that the retreat from Missionary Ridge had ceased at that point, because it was ascertained there that the pursuit had been abandoned by the Federal army. Each division, consequently, was occupying the position it had taken for the encampment of a night, and on it had constructed huts for its winter quarters. These divisions formed two corps: one commanded by Lieutenant-General Hardee, composed of Cheatham's,
could accommodate, I then turned to the east to fulfil another part of the general plan, namely, to break up all communications between Bragg and Longstreet. We had all sorts of rumors as to the latter, but it was manifest that we should interpose a proper force between these two armies. I therefore directed General Howard to move to Parker's Gap, and thence send a competent force to Red Clay, or the Council Ground, and there destroy a large section of the railroad which connects with Dalton and Cleveland. This work was most successfully and completely performed that day. The division of General Jeff. C. Davis was moved up close to Ringgold, to assist General Hooker, if needed, and the Fifteenth corps held at Greysville, for any thing that might turn up. About noon, I had a message from General Hooker, saying that he had had a pretty hard fight at the mountain pass just beyond Ringgold, and he wanted me to come forward, and turn the position. He was not aware, at the t
amed was much larger than the other two combined. The triple army aggregated the grand total of ninety-nine thousand men, six thousand of whom were cavalrymen, while four thousand four hundred and sixty belonged to the artillery. There were two hundred and fifty-four heavy guns. Soon to be pitted against Sherman's army was that of General Joseph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Dalton, in the State of Georgia, some thirty miles southeast of Chattanooga. It was by chance that Dalton became the winter quarters of the Confederate army. In the preceding autumn, when General Bragg had been defeated on Missionary Ridge and driven from the vicinity of Chattanooga, he retreated to Dalton and stopped for a night's rest. Discovering the next morning that he was not pursued, he there remained. Some time later he was superseded by General Johnston. By telegraph, General Sherman was apprised of the time when Grant was to move upon Lee on the banks of the Rapidan, in Virginia,
amed was much larger than the other two combined. The triple army aggregated the grand total of ninety-nine thousand men, six thousand of whom were cavalrymen, while four thousand four hundred and sixty belonged to the artillery. There were two hundred and fifty-four heavy guns. Soon to be pitted against Sherman's army was that of General Joseph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Dalton, in the State of Georgia, some thirty miles southeast of Chattanooga. It was by chance that Dalton became the winter quarters of the Confederate army. In the preceding autumn, when General Bragg had been defeated on Missionary Ridge and driven from the vicinity of Chattanooga, he retreated to Dalton and stopped for a night's rest. Discovering the next morning that he was not pursued, he there remained. Some time later he was superseded by General Johnston. By telegraph, General Sherman was apprised of the time when Grant was to move upon Lee on the banks of the Rapidan, in Virginia,
banks of the Ohio and the Mississippi, or to return to the several sources whence the army was gathered their respective detachments or quotas for the campaign? This should be left, however, to be determined by the nature of the enemy's operations at the time. I must finally remark that were it possible to concentrate with sufficient expedition, at or about Knoxville, such an army as I have indicated, that would be the better point whence to take the offensive into Middle Tennessee than Dalton—that is, according to the principles of war—and would promise more decisive results; for it is evident we should thus threaten the enemy's communications, without exposing our own. (Principle II.) Le secret de la guerre est dans la surete des communications (Napoleon). By a movement from Knoxville we should be doing what is taught in connection with the third maxim ( Art of War ), to wit: That part of the base of operations is the most advantageous to break out from into the theatre of war w
egram. Macon, April 6th, 1865. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Nothing certain known of movements of enemy since fall of Selma; rumored at Montgomery that Forrest fought them yesterday at Columbus, Miss. This place and Southwestern Georgia in great danger. In two weeks I may get together six thousand men, including mounted and locals. I submit to you the importance of more thorough protection to these points and the invaluable resources of Southwestern Georgia. The enemy have reinforced Dalton and other points beyond, and driven our pickets this side of Calhoun. Howell Cobb, Major-Genl. Telegram. Macon, April 7th, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: From Montgomery General Buford reports Commodore J. E. Montgomery just arrived at Greenville. Reports he left Demopolis Monday, and crossed Alabama River Tuesday; that General Jackson whipped the enemy, three thousand (3000) strong, that, moved from Tuscaloosa River, six (6) miles from Selma; the enemy retreated. Enemy's m
1 2 3 4 5