Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Dan or search for Dan in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
The journey from Greensboroa to Charlotte, the flight from that point through South Carolina, and last, that final meeting at Washington, are all events of greatest interest, and columns could be written; but these notes cannot be obtained in time for this article. An explosion. But to resume our story at Danville. As stated before, there were warehouses filled with provisions, stores, etc., for the army. The neighboring hills of Virginia and North Carolina and the valley of the River Dan were well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and the flight of the Confederate Government had been carried to them. Many stragglers from the army had already reached Danville; in fact, they had been coming daily since the retreat of Lee from Petersburg. With the dawn of day women and children, old and young, began to pour in from the surrounding country and congregated in crowds around the warehouses. There was a rear guard of two companies left to protect
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
The journey from Greensboroa to Charlotte, the flight from that point through South Carolina, and last, that final meeting at Washington, are all events of greatest interest, and columns could be written; but these notes cannot be obtained in time for this article. An explosion. But to resume our story at Danville. As stated before, there were warehouses filled with provisions, stores, etc., for the army. The neighboring hills of Virginia and North Carolina and the valley of the River Dan were well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and the flight of the Confederate Government had been carried to them. Many stragglers from the army had already reached Danville; in fact, they had been coming daily since the retreat of Lee from Petersburg. With the dawn of day women and children, old and young, began to pour in from the surrounding country and congregated in crowds around the warehouses. There was a rear guard of two companies left to protect