Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for C. A. Dana or search for C. A. Dana in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
of Rebellion, p. 555.) On the 23d of May, Mr. C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, ordered Genernorthward, the noncombatant officials, Stanton, Dana, Holt, Halleck, President Johnson and others, wanton sent the Assistant Secretary of War, Mr. C. A. Dana, to the fort to supervise the details of theavy ordnance, and well-armed men-of-war. Mr. Dana's patriotic soul must have been stirred withioung and handsome Major-General in charge. Mr. Dana further describes Mr. Davis' dress, and depicGeneral Miles, on the 24th day of May, wrote to Dana: Yesterday I directed that irons be put on Daviobably intended only for the sympathetic eye of Dana, but the battle-scarred veterans, assigned to terely obeyed orders. It is true that Assistant Secretary Dana had authorized and directed the fettween the two casemated rooms, and, according to Dana, as quoted above, were wooden, it is true. butfrom the oblivion they justly deserve. Thus, Mr. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, had in his order[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
of Rebellion, p. 555.) On the 23d of May, Mr. C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, ordered Genernorthward, the noncombatant officials, Stanton, Dana, Holt, Halleck, President Johnson and others, wanton sent the Assistant Secretary of War, Mr. C. A. Dana, to the fort to supervise the details of toung and handsome Major-General in charge. Mr. Dana further describes Mr. Davis' dress, and depicer, on the same day, while still at the fort, Mr. Dana, alarmed probably by remembering that the strobably intended only for the sympathetic eye of Dana, but the battle-scarred veterans, assigned to terely obeyed orders. It is true that Assistant Secretary Dana had authorized and directed the fettme condition when the anklets were used as when Dana wrote he had not given orders to have him placefrom the oblivion they justly deserve. Thus, Mr. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, had in his orderhis superiors—President Johnson, Mr. Stanton, Mr. Dana, and General Holt—than from the cruel nature [4 more...]<