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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 9.-the battle of West-point, Va. Fought May 7, 1862. (search)
en became anxious to know why they had been brought to a country where there was no foe. About dusk a part of the division of Gen. Sedgwick, under the command of Gen. Dana, arrived in transports from Yorktown and remained in the centre of the river, while some of our light-draft gunboats took a trip up the rivers Pamunkey and Metap received some half-dozen of our heavy shells in their midst. This was communicated to Gen. Slocum, who immediately made strenuous efforts to get the brigade of Gen. Dana on shore, that we might be able to give the enemy a warm reception should he make his appearance. Gen. Dana was indefatigable in his labors to get the troops ofGen. Dana was indefatigable in his labors to get the troops off the transports, and through his exertions most of the men and horses were off the boats by nine o'clock, and preparations were being made to breakfast the men of this brigade, when the order was given for the Sixteenth, Thirty-first, and Thirty-second New-York, and the Ninety-fifth and Ninety-sixth Pennsylvania regiments to advan
my old battery, and I'm going to have it, alluding to Kirby's, which he, Magruder, formerly commanded. Meantime part of Dana's brigade had come up. His Nineteenth Massachusetts and Forty-second New-York had been detached for picket duty and artillremitting fury. The rebels found it impossible to break our inflexible lines, and we found it difficult to shake him off. Dana's wing was finally swung round almost on the hypothenuse of an angle to the original line of battle, his gallant Michigandl in their places, animating and encouraging the men by their example, and the men moving unflinchingly towards their foe. Dana, on the left, narrowly escaped death. His dashing gray received a bullet in his crest, which he cast off with a snort of wledged with frenzied acclamations by the stout regiments wherever he exhibited himself. No more could have been asked by Dana. He proved himself a fearless soldier. Capt. Sedgwick, Assistant Adjutant-General to General Sedgwick, and Lieut. Howe,
rward got together. The Fifteenth Massachusetts went into action with seventeen officers and nearly six hundred men. Nine officers were killed or wounded, and some of the latter are prisoners. Capt. Simons, Capt. Saunders of the sharp-shooters, Lieut. Derby, and Lieut. Berry are killed. Capt. Bartlett and Capt. Jocelyn, Lieut. Spurr, Lieut. Gale, and Lieut. Bradley are wounded. One hundred and thirty-four men were the only remains that could be collected of this splendid regiment. Gen. Dana was wounded. Gen. Howard, who took command of the division after Gen. Sedgwick was disabled, exerted himself to restore order; but it could not be done there. Gen. Sumner ordered the line to be re-formed. The test was too severe for volunteer, troops under such a fire. Sumner himself attempted to arrest the disorder, but to little purpose. Lieut.-Col. Revere and Capt. Audenried of his staff were wounded severely, but not dangerously. It was impossible to hold the position. Gen. Sumn
rward got together. The Fifteenth Massachusetts went into action with seventeen officers and nearly six hundred men. Nine officers were killed or wounded, and some of the latter are prisoners. Capt. Simons, Capt. Saunders of the sharp-shooters, Lieut. Derby, and Lieut. Berry are killed. Capt. Bartlett and Capt. Jocelyn, Lieut. Spurr, Lieut. Gale, and Lieut. Bradley are wounded. One hundred and thirty-four men were the only remains that could be collected of this splendid regiment. Gen. Dana was wounded. Gen. Howard, who took command of the division after Gen. Sedgwick was disabled, exerted himself to restore order; but it could not be done there. Gen. Sumner ordered the line to be re-formed. The test was too severe for volunteer, troops under such a fire. Sumner himself attempted to arrest the disorder, but to little purpose. Lieut.-Col. Revere and Capt. Audenried of his staff were wounded severely, but not dangerously. It was impossible to hold the position. Gen. Sumn