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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 610 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 21 5 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 18 2 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 9 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Charles A. Dana or search for Charles A. Dana in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
man, member of the House, said two years later (July 9, 1856) that Sumner merited chastisement for the speech. Sumner described, on his return home, to his friend Dana, the Senate in executive session, as it seemed at that period, like the cabin of a pirate, where the only test of fitness for office was fidelity to the slave-power. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. pp. 288, 289. Clay's proposition to send him to Coventry was thought more practicable. It had Sumner's co-operation to this extent, that he had not from this time of his own accord any personal relations with his five assailants. Without any dread of another encounter, the next day he offin the speech the heaviest blow its author had struck the slaveholding oligarchy, and again recalled with pleasure his own part in placing him in the Senate. Charles A. Dana, of the New York Tribune, approved it as a splendid excoriation and incineration of those fellows. Rev. A. A. Livermore gratefully acknowledged the noble, lo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
ajos Batthyanyi, the Hungarian patriot. On his return, while at Mr. Furness's in Philadelphia, he called with Mr. Allibone on an old friend, Henry D. Gilpin, an invalid with but few days in store, cheering him with a report of the kind inquiries made concerning him by the Grotes and other English friends. He declined at the time two invitations in New York city,—one to address the New England Society, dressed by Mr. Evarts; and the other to speak in the Academy of Music, given by Greeley, C. A. Dana, H. C. Bowen, and Oliver Johnson. Warned by physicians and friends to enter slowly into the excitement of debate, Among bills and resolutions offered by him, not elsewhere noted, were these: for the substitution of simple declarations for custom-house oaths (Works, vol. IV. p. 441): for the promotion of the safety of passengers on steamers between New York and San Francisco (Works, vol. IV. p. 455); for limiting the liability of shipowners; for preventing violence and crime on board