Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. B. Danforth or search for J. B. Danforth in all documents.

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duty in the field-works at Camp Lincoln, and left behind under Lieut-Col. Buck. While absent to the front, these four companies, by order of Gen. Porter, and without my knowledge, were sent into the woods, suffering a most galling fire. Their loss was: enlisted men killed, twelve; wounded, fifteen; missing, forty; making a total of ninety-seven enlisted men. I also regret to record the death of Col. I. M. Tucker, and probably Major Ryerson, both of whom were left upon the field; also Captain Danforth, mortally wounded, and Lieuts. Plewitt, Root and Bogert, severely wounded, and Lieut. Callan missing. They, however, sustained themselves most gallantly, and proved their courage against superior numbers. The fate of the Fourth regiment, Col. Simpson, one of my most efficient regiments, as regards officers and men, was most painful. At the moment when victory seemed wavering in the balance, an aid of Gen. McClellan took them from my command and ordered them into the woods. All the
necessary. We have a gallant army in the field, upon whom we fully and confidently rely; but no effort should be spared which can contribute to the noble object. The capital of Virginia must not be surrendered. Virginians must rally to the rescue. L. S. Given under my hand and under the seal of the Commonwealth, at Richmond, this fifteenth day of May, 1862, and in the eighty-sixth year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. The meeting thus called assembled at the City Hall, Capt. J. B. Danforth presiding, and Mayor Mayo and Governor Letcher made speeches. Mr. Joseph Mayo, the Mayor of the city, stated that the City Council had adopted resolutions requesting the Governor to place the Tredegar battalion at his disposal for the defence of the city. He indorsed in the most enthusiastic manner the proposed action of the meeting, and said that if the city of Richmond was ever surrendered to our enemies it should not be by a descendant of its founder. He would sooner die tha
necessary. We have a gallant army in the field, upon whom we fully and confidently rely; but no effort should be spared which can contribute to the noble object. The capital of Virginia must not be surrendered. Virginians must rally to the rescue. L. S. Given under my hand and under the seal of the Commonwealth, at Richmond, this fifteenth day of May, 1862, and in the eighty-sixth year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. The meeting thus called assembled at the City Hall, Capt. J. B. Danforth presiding, and Mayor Mayo and Governor Letcher made speeches. Mr. Joseph Mayo, the Mayor of the city, stated that the City Council had adopted resolutions requesting the Governor to place the Tredegar battalion at his disposal for the defence of the city. He indorsed in the most enthusiastic manner the proposed action of the meeting, and said that if the city of Richmond was ever surrendered to our enemies it should not be by a descendant of its founder. He would sooner die tha