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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 2 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 27 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John W. Daniel or search for John W. Daniel in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
ontravention of some of the claim set up by biographers of General Jackson, were necessarily constrained to silence; and even after General Lee's death there was still some reluctance on the part of General Lee's staff to say anything that might seem to detract from the fame of General Jackson. The first public allusion to the fact that the famous stroke of generalship, which won the Battle of Chancellorsville, was directed by Lee and executed by Jackson, seems to have been made by Major John W. Daniel, in his address at the Fifth Annual Re-union of the Army of Northern Virginia, in October 1875, nine years after the publication of the Life and Campaigns of Lieutenant-General Thomas J. Jackson, in which Dr. R. L. Dabney stated that at a conference between Lee and Jackson on the night of May 1st, 1863, General Jackson proposed to throw his command entirely into Hooker's rear. But it was not until the Ninth Annual Re-union of the Association, in October, 1879, that General Fitzhugh L
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
ose dates-April 2d to April 9th, 1865. I have had collected a number of names which might have been forgotten or lost sight of, and hereby ask any one who has knowledge or information to send it to me at Lynchburg, Va. Very respectfully, John W. Daniel. Bushrod Rust writes. Dear Major Daniel,—In the Confederate column, Sunday, July I, 1906, I noticed your inquiry, To what company and regiment Ashby, who was killed at Appomattox, belonged? Buckner Ashby, a wealthy farmer, residMajor Daniel,—In the Confederate column, Sunday, July I, 1906, I noticed your inquiry, To what company and regiment Ashby, who was killed at Appomattox, belonged? Buckner Ashby, a wealthy farmer, resided near Stone Bridge, Clark county, Va., before and at the commencement of the war between the States, and had three grown sons, James Lewis, John William, and Buckner G. Ashby. At the commencement of hostilities James Lewis Ashby enlisted in Company D, Clarke Cavalry, Sixth Virginia Regiment, and was killed in action at the battle of Trevillian's, June 12, 1864, Hampton commanding Confederates and Sheridan the Federals. He was a gallant soldier, a most estimable gentleman, and a true patr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
f the brigade; i. e., the Fourth, Twenty-seventh and Fifth. When Colonel James P. Preston went forward with the Fourth, the Twenty-seventh, under Lieutenant-Colonel John Echols, moved simultaneously, and the two regiments commingled at the captured guns, each losing heavily in the charge. From the material collected in the contribution to The Times-Dispatch, the historian, with the aid of the War Records, can now compute the complete story of the Stonewall Brigade at First Manassas. John W. Daniel. Colonel Cummings's account. On the night of the 20th of July, 1861, our army lay in rear and facing Bull Run, the right resting near Union Mills, and the left at the Stone bridge. General Beauregard expected to be attacked the next morning on the front and right, but very soon in the morning he and General Johnston saw that the enemy was moving on the Centreville road, in the direction of the Stone bridge, with the view of attacking and turning our left flank, the demonstration o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Esten, 9. Craney Island, Battle of, 147. Crocker, Hon. James F., 128. Crocker, Rev W. A., 50. Crook, General, George, 289. Crouch, Dr. Richard G., 179. Cummings, Colonel Arthur C., 363. Custer, General G. A., 180. Cutheriell, Captain C. A., 160. Dabney. Dr. R. L. 2,179. Dahlgren Raid, 181; How a woman saved Richmond from, 353. Dahlgren, Colonel, Ulric, 181; Savage orders of, 187, 188, 356; Negro hung by, 184, 356; Murder of two boys, 185; Looting by his men, 189. Daniel, Major John W 2 195 218, 244 327. David's Island Hospital, 32. Davidson, Lieutenant, Hunter, 323. Davis, wounded Colonel, 199. Dearing, Major, James, 329. Decisive Battles of the World, 255. Devens, General, Charles, 273 Douglas, Colonel, Henry Kyd, 195. Drewry, Major Augustus H. 82. Drewry's Bluff, New Light on Battle of, 82. Early, General J. A., Strategy of, and thin gray line at Cedar Creek, 195– Valley Campaign of, 272; Ordered Chambersburg to be burned in retaliatio