hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 46 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 46 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 36 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 26 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 10 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Dante or search for Dante in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
n wittily said, have nothing in common but the initial letter; Atlantic Monthly (Nov. 1887), vol IX. p. 718. and a German thinker has written that no one can be blind to his own merit any more than to his height. Schopenhauer. A reviewer of Macaulay, Quarterly Review, July and Oct. 1876, p. 6. who was also accused of an inordinate estimate of himself, has tersely said of vanity that it is a defect rather than a vice; never admitted into the septenary catalogue of the mortal sins of Dante and the Church; often lodged by the side of high and strict virtue, often allied with an amiable and playful innocence,—a token of imperfection, a deduction from greatness, and no more. This quality or habit of Sumner, whatever he had of it, was harmless. It led him to no distorted view of men and things, to no underestimate of other mien's powers, to no disparagement of their work, and no disregard of their opinions and counsels. Jealousy and envy were no part of his nature. He praise
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
mber 10: In my rapid rambles I have enjoyed much of nature and art. Switzerland every moment, in every mountain, hill, lake, river, valley, and field, filled me with delight. The North of Italy left a painful impression, for everywhere were white-coated Austrians. Germany more than satisfied me by its prevailing intelligence and civilization. I have made many little pilgrimages,—to Brescia, because there was the original of Thorwaldsen's Day and night to Verona, because it sheltered Dante in his exile; to Vicenza, because it was the home of the architect Palladio; and to Worms, because of Luther. These days have been sweet and happy. Everywhere I have taken to the pictures, and also to the engravings. The gallery at Dresden is most charming. No building or institution has impressed me so much as the emperor's stalls at Vienna, with seven hundred horses stalled in a palace. I left with admiration of the palatial structure, vast in extent, and of the horses, which were mos
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
ed a note, recalling how heartily he grasped Sumner's hand at their last meeting at Argyll Lodge. Motley wrote Sumner, Jan. 2, 1860: Do you remember the breakfast at Holly Lodge? This was the last time we had any of us the pleasure of meeting Macaulay, I believe. I am sure it was the last time that I saw him, and I am not likely to forget it very soon. Do you remember how gay and amusing he was after breakfast, in his library,—repeating ballads from Mother Goose, and quoting stanzas from Dante's Inferno in the same breath, and fighting Monckton Milnes about German poetry? Well, in that very room, and in the very arm-chair in which he then sat, he breathed his last, on Wednesday evening last, 28 December. For once Sumner came home for the Christmas and New Year holidays. While at home he was presented by James Freeman Clarke, George W. Bond. and others with an interesting souvenir,—a dessert service of knives and forks once belonging to Lajos Batthyanyi, the Hungarian patr