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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 66 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 35 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 34 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Charles S. Daveis or search for Charles S. Daveis in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
—even if it be but a week,—I shall, I hope, devote myself to some study, many more hours in the day than I do at home. In August of the same year he gave to Mr. Daveis, of Portland, Maine, much the same sketch of his plans:— This next winter I shall pass at the South, to see the men the cities contain, and get some notio preserved, and of these two are given as specimens of his intellectual activity and the warmth of his affections. The sketch of Mr. Jeffrey, in the letter to Mr. Daveis, will be recognized as an admirable pen-portrait, especially for so young an artist. The power of drawing characters with a firm and discriminating touch does a case; but still, in spite of precedent and authority, I calculate on your submission to Horace, Homer, Milton, and George Ticknor! Vive atque vale. To Charles S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, February 8, 1814. If all the world had their deserts, said the heir-apparent of Denmark in my hearing last night, who should escape wh<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
t instantly after the first reverse should occur, and to give it the force of prophecy. The battle of Waterloo came like a thunder-clap. The article was suppressed, and one on Gall and his Craniology was substituted for it. There it may still be found. I think Mr. Southey said he had seen the repudiated article. While in Liverpool, Mr. Ticknor made the acquaintance of Mr. Roscoe, then in the enjoyment of wealth as well as fame, and gives a sketch of him in a letter to his friend, Mr. Daveis:— Of the acquaintances whom I found or formed in Liverpool, I know not that you will be much interested to hear of any but Mr. Roscoe, whom you already know as an author, and probably as the Lorenzo of his native city; for, like the happy subject he has chosen, he is himself a lover of, and a proficient in, the fine arts, and has done more to encourage and patronize learning than all his fellow-citizens put together. But he is now beginning to bend with age, and has retired from act
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
Chapter 5: Residence in Gottingen till the close of 1816. German literature. German metaphysics. anecdotes of Blumenbach and Wolf. Leipsic. Dresden. Berlin. Weimar. visit to Goethe. receives the offer of the Professorship of French and Spanish literature at Harvard. To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Gottingen, February 29, 1816. . . . . You will perhaps expect from me some notices of German literature, as I am now established in the very midst of it; and if you do not, I may as well write you about it as about something not half so interesting. . . . . To come to the subject, then, and begin in defiance of Horace,—ab ovo Ledce,—you know there are in this land of gutturals and tobacco two dialects: high German, so called because it is indigenous in the interior and higher parts of the country; and low German, so called because it is indigenous in the North, among the lowlands, and on the coast. How long these dialects have existed, it is not now possible to d
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
ld just distinguish in the distant horizon. . . . . November 2.—This morning we were already on the road when the same sun appeared again, in the cloudless splendor of an Italian sky, from behind the hills of Tivoli . . . . Turning suddenly round a projecting height, . . . . Rome, with its seven hills, and all its towers and turrets and pinnacles, with the Castle of St. Angelo and the cupola of St. Peter's,—Rome, in all the splendor of the Eternal City, bursts at once upon us. To Charles S. Daveis. Rome, November 19, 1817. . . . . What can I say to you that will not disappoint the expectations that my date excites? for it is not enough to tell you I have enjoyed myself more in Italy than in all the rest of Europe, and that Rome is worth all the other cities in the world, unless I add some distinct account of my pleasures, . . . . so that you can in some sort share them with me. One of the great pleasures in Rome is certainly that of going out to see its churches, palaces, a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
hosen seat of Arabian luxury; and the convents in the city and its environs were just ringing their matins. In the nearest I could occasionally catch the tones of the organ and the choir, while from the most remote the tolling of the bell had almost died away before it reached me in the intervals of the morning breeze. All was in harmony,—the hour, the season, and the scene; and when the sun rose, it rose on one of the most splendid and glorious prospects in the world. In a letter to Mr. Daveis, December 5, 1818, Mr. Ticknor says: The Alhambra, a name which will make my blood thrill if I live to the frosts of a century, not that the pleasure I received, on wandering over the immense extent of these most graceful and most picturesque of all ruins, was like the quiet, hallowed delight of a solitary, secret visit to the Coliseum or the Forum, when the moonbeams slept upon the wrecks of three empires and twenty-five hundred years, for it was nothing of all this; but it was a riotous,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
On his seventy-sixth birthday Mr. Ticknor made a memorandum which was preserved, and which may appropriately be introduced here. It is headed, Aug. 1, ‘67. Persons with whom I have lived in long friendship, and contains the names of sixteen early friends, and the dates of the commencement of each acquaintance. They are these: Curtis, C. P., from 1793; Everett, E., 1806; Everett, A. H., 1806; Prescott, W. H., 1808; Webster, D., 1808, but also slightly 1802, 1805, 1807; Haven, N. A., 1808; Daveis, C. S., 1809; Gardiner, R. H., 1812; Story, J., 1815; Allston, W., 1819. Others who survive, Curtis, T. B., from 1795; Thayer, S., 1805; Bigelow, J., 1808; Savage, J., 1809; Mason, W. P., 1809; Cogswell, J. G., 1810. Five of these gentlemen outlived him. In his old age he still had friends whom he had counted as such for sixty years, although he had outlived so many. With regard to two of those intimacies which colored and added interest to his life in the period now opening before him, h
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
on, and was received, alike by lawyers and laymen, with a warmth of welcome due to his talents, learning, and worth. Mr. Ticknor saw him often, and thus writes of him to his friend Mr. Daveis, and to his brother-in-law Mr. Eliot:— To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, September 19, 1823. my dear Charles,—. . . . Your very gay and happy letter of the 23d of August came in one morning just as the Chancellor was with me, and we were setting off for Nahant. I had the pleasure, too, that guished man whom he had learned to love and venerate in his home at La Grange. He had the pleasure of receiving General Lafayette, more than once, as his guest, and after one of these occasions he writes thus to his friend Daveis:— To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, September 28, 1824. I wish with all my heart, my dear Charles, that you had come up to see us when the old General was here; and if I had at all anticipated what kind and degree of excitement his visit would produce, we<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
nt and the assembled citizens. A full account of the Eulogy, and of the scene of its delivery, written by Mr. Ticknor, is given in Mr. Curtis's Life of Webster, Vol. I. p. 274. Mr. Ticknor describes it in the following letter:— To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Newport, Rhode island, August 17, 1826. Your letter of Sunday evening, my dear Charles, arrived at Boston on Wednesday morning, just as we were bustling away to hear the great oration. Would it had been yourself instead of your in his hours of easy gayety justified its use in a surprising way. This is what I think may be called a great man. A few months later he writes thus of his various occupations, and especially of his sketch of his friend Haven:— To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, February 24, 1827. Sickness, much labor, and many cares, my dear Charles, have prevented me from writing to you or to anybody else, for a long time, except on business that could not be postponed. But I begin to feel a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
e the variety and nature of his interests; but, at this time, even these are not very ample for the purpose. To C. S. Daveis, Portland. August 3, 1831. I do not know how it may be with you in partibus, but politics here are truly amusing. ch I impute, in part, to the severe illness of the last summer. The little boy is excellently thriving. . . . . To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, January 26, 1834. Mrs. T. has not been so well or so strong for six or eight years, perhaps nevtime the hearts of both parents. A few weeks after this bereavement Mr. Ticknor wrote to Mr. Daveis thus:— To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Cambridge, Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor were on a visit to Mrs. Norton. August 20, 1834. my dear Charles,—Yourtake the whole care of him, and to be with him almost constantly from the beginning to the end, five full weeks. To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, October 25, 1834. Sorrow still dwells among us, and must for a season. The melancholy which is
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
eorge Ticknor, 4, 317; letter to G. S. Hillard, 326, 391. Curtis, Harriet, 4. Curtis, Rev., Philip, 3. Curtis, T. B., 316 note. Custis, Miss Nellie (Mrs. Peter), 38. Cuvier, Baron, 255. D Dahl, J. C. C., 482, 490. Dallas's Report, 30. Dalton, Mr., 422. Dante, study of, 85, 86, 394, 466, 470, 472, 475 and note, 482. Dartmouth College, Elisha Ticknor graduate of, 1, 5; case of, vs. Woodward, 4; Dr. Wheelock, President of, 5; G. T. member and graduate of, 6, 7. Daveis, Charles S., 316 note; letters to, 24, 43, 51, 87, 169, 232 note, 334, 336, 337, 339, 344, 378, 379, 394, 396, 397, 398, 399, 401. Davis, Hart, 447. Davis, Judge, 329, 340, 355. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. I. P., 328. Davis, Mr., Samuel, 329. Davoust, Madame, 146, 147. Davoust, Marechal, 146, 147. Davy, Dr., 271. Davy, Lady, 57, 128. Davy, Sir, Humphry, 54, 57, 60, 128, 152. Day, Professor, 14. Deaf-Mutes, teaching of, in Madrid, 196. De Bresson, 501. De Candolle, A. P. de, 154, 155.