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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
aus's and Davis's forces, as well as the coolness and bravery of their infantry, supported by Welfley's, Hoffmann's, and Davidson's batteries. Major-General Peter J. Osterhaus. From a photograph. Osterhaus changed his front twice under the fire ofline; the second brigade (the 37th and 59th Illinois), under Colonel White, formed on the left of the road, supported by Davidson's battery. Colonel Carr, although wounded, assisted in placing these troops. It was a little after 6 o'clock in they to mount, and anxiously awaiting the return of the staff-officers, when suddenly a few cannon-shots in our front, from Davidson's Union battery, announced the conflict. At this moment General Curtis, to whom I had sent word during the night where osted on the left. On our right, communication was established with the right wing, and the two batteries of Klauss and Davidson were brought into line with our own, while the two brigades of Colonels Julius White and Thomas Pattison held the left o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
0.] General Buckner's division 6 regiments and 2 batteries — constituted the right wing, and was posted to cover the land approaches to the water-batteries. a left wing was organized into six brigades, commanded respectively by Colonels Heiman, Davidson, Drake, Wharton, McCausland, and Baldwin, and posted from right to left in the order named. Four batteries were distributed amongst the left wing. General Bushrod R. Johnson, an able officer, served the General commanding as chief-of-staff. Dof the 14th--easy to see and understand with something more than approximate exactness the oppositions of the two forces. Smith is on the left of the Union army opposite Buckner. My division, in the center, confronts Colonels Heiman, Drake, and Davidson, each with a brigade. McClernand, now well over on the right, keeps the road to Charlotte and Nashville against the Major part of Pillow's left wing. The infantry on both sides are in cover behind the crests of the hills or in thick woods, lis
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
intelligence, and he was ably seconded by the officers around him, many of whom had been men of conspicuous ability in the old navy. In the branches of ordnance and torpedoes he relied largely upon two men, Commander John M. Brooke and Lieutenant Hunter Davidson. To Brooke were due the banded guns which proved of such signal use during the war, while Davidson did much to develop the torpedo service, which probably contributed more to the defense of the Confederacy than all the vessels of its nDavidson did much to develop the torpedo service, which probably contributed more to the defense of the Confederacy than all the vessels of its navy. In 1862, some impatience was shown by the press and the public of the South at the continued succession of naval disasters, and a Congressional committee made an exhaustive investigation of the department. Nothing of importance was disclosed except the condition of affairs at New Orleans in 1861-62, already referred to, for which the Navy Department was partly responsible, but which was largely owing to the poverty of Confederate resources. It was especially in his quick perception o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
uccessful career. Under him were as capable a set of officers as ever were brought together in one ship. But of man-of-war's men or sailors we had scarcely any. The South was almost without a maritime population. In the old service the majority of officers were from the South, and all the seamen from the North. The officers of the Merrimac were: Flag-Officer, Franklin Buchanan; Lieutenants, Catesby ap R. Jones (executive and ordnance officer), Charles C. Simms, R. D. Minor (flag), Hunter Davidson, John Taylor Wood, J. R. Eggleston, Walter Butt; Midshipmen, Foute, Marmaduke, Littlepage, Craig, Long, and Rootes; Paymaster, James Semple; Surgeon, Dinwiddie Phillips; Assistant-Surgeon, Algernon S. Garnett; Captain of Marines, Reuben Thorn; Engineers, H. A. Ramsey, acting chief; Assistants, Tynan, Campbell, Herring, Jack, and White; Boatswain, Hasker; Gunner, Oliver; Carpenter, Lindsey; Clerk, Arthur Sinclair, Jr.; Volunteer Aides, Lieutenant Douglas Forrest, C. S. A., Captain Kevil,
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 40: Vice-President Stephens's commission to Washington. (search)
y and instructions of your letter to me, on the 2d instant I proceeded on the mission therein assigned without delay. The steamer Torpedo, commanded by Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, of the navy, was put in readiness as soon as possible, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, and tendered for the service. At noon, on the 3d, she stNews, we were met by a small boat of the enemy, carrying two guns, which also raised a white flag before approaching us. The officer in command informed Lieutenant Davidson that he had orders from Admiral Lee, on board the United States flagship Minnesota, lying below and then in view, not to allow any boat or vessel to pass tht or about this point in the river until the 6th instant, when, having heard nothing further from the Admiral, at twelve o'clock M., on that day, I directed Lieutenant Davidson again to speak the gun-boat on guard, and to hand to the officer in command another note to the Admiral. This was done. A copy of the note is here appende
f a communication in writing from Jeff Davis, Commander-in-Chief of the land and naval forces of the confederate States, to Abraham Lincoln, Commander-in-Chief of the land and naval forces of the United States. Hon. Robert Ould, confederate States Agent of Exchange, accompanies me as secretary for the purpose of delivering the communication in person and conferring upon the subject to which it relates. I desire to proceed directly to Washington in the steamer Torpedo, commanded by Lieutenant Hunter Davidson of the confederate States navy; no person being on board but the Hon. Mr. Ould, myself, the boat's officers and crew. Yours most respectfully, Alexander H. Stephens. To S. H. Lee, Admiral etc. Navy Department, July 4, 1863. To Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, Hampton Roads: The request of Alexander H. Stephens is inadmissible. The customary agents and channels are adequate for all needful communication and conference between the United States forces and the insurgents. Gideon Wel
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 34.-the Mission of A. T. Stephens. (search)
d instructions of your letter to me on the second instant, I proceeded on the mission therein assigned without delay. The steamer Torpedo, commanded by Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, of the navy, was put in readiness as soon as possible, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, and tendered for the service. At noon, on the third, she News, we were met by a small boat of the enemy, carrying two guns, which also raised a white flag before approaching us. The officer in command informed Lieutenant Davidson that he had orders from Admiral Lee, on board the United States flag-ship Minnesota, lying below, and then in view, not to allow any boat or vessel to pass t or about this point in the river until the sixth instant, when, having heard nothing further from the Admiral, at twelve o'clock M. on that day I directed Lieutenant Davidson again to speak the gunboat on guard, and to hand to the officer in command another note to the Admiral. This was done; a copy of the note is appended, mark
appeal to the friends of humanity throughout the State to use their utmost efforts to procure as speedily as possible an honorable peace. In the name of reason, of suffering humanity, and of the religion which we profess, would I appeal to the public men and statesmen of North-Carolina, and especially of that eminent statesman who possess in a greater degree than all others the confidence of the people of the State, and who has recently been elevated to a high place in the confederate government, to lend a helping hand and use his influence to bring about an honorable peace. And, lastly, I would appeal to ministers and professors of our holy religion to pray constantly — without dictation of terms — to Almighty God for an honorable peace. Having but recently occupied a large space in your columns, I feel that I am intruding, and will, therefore, after expressing my obligations to you, close for the present. Davidson, Clemontsville, N. C., July 16, 1863. --Raleigh Standard, July
visions. An examination of the ford led Generals Davidson and Steele to hesitate about trusting thle, besides a large number taken in moving by Davidson's cavalry. At this rate General Steele would carried into execution. Generals Steele and Davidson reconnoitred the ground in person, and selecte, and Captain Gerster, Chief-Engineer on General Davidson's staff, was instructed to construct it ias not a breath of air stirring, and when General Davidson sent an order for it and Ritter's brigadeock. They were in danger of being cut off by Davidson, of whose intended crossing they had been apps and skill is largely due the success of General Davidson's movements. Crossing a river under firidge. Steele was already upon the move, and Davidson, pushing past the infantry, which was immedia heard at the mouth of the bayou at which General Davidson, bringing up the remainder of the column, upon the bar with all possible rapidity, General Davidson dashed among the fugitives with his drawn[11 more...]
ing. After him the First brigade, Colonel Minty commanding, on same duty, and Colonel Long's brigade was posted above Minty, in the neighborhood of Washington, Tennessee. I desire to say nothing about why the rebels were permitted to cross, as the officer in command at the ford where the crossing was effected will have to answer for that hereafter, probably before a military tribunal. On the morning of the thirtieth, the enemy crossed in force of four divisions — Wharton's, Martin's, Davidson's, and Armstrong's — the whole under command of Wheeler. When General Crook learned they were across, notwithstanding his precautions, he immediately ordered the regiments on duty above to move down the river and rejoin him, which they did, finding the General four miles below Smith's cross-roads, and about twelve below Washington. Next morning, October first, a reconnoissance to the cross-roads, by the Fourth Michigan, discovered the enemy ascending Waldron's Ridge. At two o'clock P
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