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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brewster, William, 1560-1644 (search)
Brewster, William, 1560-1644 A Pilgrim Father; born in Scrooby, England, in 1560. Educated at Cambridge, he entered the service of William Davidson, ambassador of Queen Elizabeth in Holland. The ambassador was much attached to Brewster, and procured for him the office of postmaster at Scrooby. When his mind was turned very seriously towards religious subjects, he withdrew from the Church of England, and established a dissenting society, or rather a society of Separatists. This new society worshipped on Sabbath days at Mr. Brewster's house until persecution began to interrupt them. He, with Mr. Bradford and others, was among those who attempted to fly to Holland in 1607. (See Robinson, John.) They were arrested and imprisoned at Boston in Lincolnshire. As Mr. Brewster had the most property, he was the greater sufferer. At much expense he gained his liberty, and then he assisted the poorer members of the church to escape, following them himself soon afterwards. At Leyden he
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cowan's Ford, (search)
Cowan's Ford, On the Catawba River, N. C. Lord Cornwallis, in rapid pursuit of the Americans under General Morgan, was prevented from crossing by a sudden rise after the Americans had crossed. Cornwallis moved down a few miles towards Cowan's Ford, where Morgan had stationed 300 militia under General Davidson to oppose his crossing. The British forced a crossing, Feb. 1, 1781, and the militia were dispersed, General Davidson being killed. Cowan's Ford, On the Catawba River, N. C. Lord Cornwallis, in rapid pursuit of the Americans under General Morgan, was prevented from crossing by a sudden rise after the Americans had crossed. Cornwallis moved down a few miles towards Cowan's Ford, where Morgan had stationed 300 militia under General Davidson to oppose his crossing. The British forced a crossing, Feb. 1, 1781, and the militia were dispersed, General Davidson being killed.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davidson, William, 1746- (search)
Davidson, William, 1746- Military officer; born in Lancaster county, Pa., in 1746; was appointed major in one of the North Carolina regiments at the outbreak of the Revolution; took part in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth; commissioned brigadier-general; and was at Cowan's Ford, N. C., Feb. 1, 1781, when the British army under Cornwallis forced a passage. During the fight General Davidson was killed. Davidson, William, 1746- Military officer; born in Lancaster county, Pa., in 1746; was appointed major in one of the North Carolina regiments at the outbreak of the Revolution; took part in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth; commissioned brigadier-general; and was at Cowan's Ford, N. C., Feb. 1, 1781, when the British army under Cornwallis forced a passage. During the fight General Davidson was killed.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Little Rock, capture of (search)
10. They pushed back General Marmaduke, who confronted them; and early in September they moved on the State capital, in two columns, led by Generals Steele and Davidson, having been reinforced. Gen. Sterling Price was in chief command of the Confederates. At Bayou Fourche, on the south side of the river, Davidson was confronteDavidson was confronted by Marmaduke, and, after a sharp struggle for two hours, the Confederates fell back towards the city. At the same time Steele was moving in a parallel line on the north side of the river. When the Nationals reached Little Rock the Confederates had abandoned it, and on the evening of Sept. 10 the city and its military appurtenances were surrendered to Davidson by the civil authorities. The troops had fled to Arkadelphia, on the Washita River. When the National troops entered the city eight steamboats, fired by the retreating Confederates, were in flames. In his campaign of forty days Steele lost about 100 men, killed, wounded, and prisoners, and capt
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
red in, rose in toppling piles which almost — not quite — daunted her; she would hear every one, would answer as many as flesh and blood could compass. Here is one of them:-- Most hearty congratulations on your ninetieth birthday from the boy you picked up somewhere in New York and placed in the New York Orphan Asylum on April 6th, 1841. Sorry I have never been able to meet you in all that time. You [were] one of the Board of Trustees at that time. Respectfully and Thankfully, Wm. Davidson. I was then about five years old, now seventy-three. Writing to her friend of many years, Mrs. Ellen Mitchell, she says:-- Your birthday letter was and is much valued by me. Its tone of earnest affection is an element in the new inspiration recently given me by such a wonderful testimony of public and private esteem and goodwill as has been granted me in connection with my attainment of ninety years. It all points to the future. I must work to deserve what I have received.
I, 10, 12. Cutler, Julia, see Ward. Cutler, Louisa, see McAllister. Cutler, Sarah M. H., I, 10, 12, 13, 17, 39, 40, 42; II, 319. Cyclades, I, 272. Cyprus, II, 42. Czerwinsk, II, 12, 13, 14. Dana, R. H., Jr., I, 226. D'Annunzio, II, 285. Dante, Alighieri, I, 174, 330; II, 26, 27, 120, 357. Dantzig, II, 15, 18. Daubigny, C. F., II, 172. Daughters of the American Revolution, I, 179, 194, 351. Davenport, E. L., I, 204. Davidson, Thomas, II, 128. Davidson, Wm., letter of, II, 390. Davis, James C., I, 201, 251. Davis, Jefferson, I, 222. Davis, Mary F., I, 304. Davis, Theodore, II, 251. Dead Sea, II, 38, 39. Declaration of Independence, I, 4. DeKoven, Reginald, II, 195. Deland, Lorin, II, 332, 333. Deland, Margaret, II, 303, 332. Delineator, II, 381. DeLong, G. W., I, 322, 325. Demesmaker, see Cutler, John. Denver, II, 152, 153. Descartes, Rene, II, 397. Desgrange, Mme., II, 240. Detroit, II, 141.
wo days, closing with the gallant participation in the evening fight of the 20th, which resulted in the capture of about 150 prisoners, 1 stand of colors and 12 Colt revolving rifles. Among the prisoners were Colonel Carlton and Lieutenant-Colonel McLaw. There were few casualties in his command, nearly all of which occurred on the 19th. Maj.-Gen. J. P. Anderson in this campaign commanded Hindman's division of Polk's corps. In his report he made the following special mention of Lieut. William Davidson, of Quincy, Fla., a young officer on his staff: Lieut. William M. Davidson, aide-de-camp, was, as he had been at Shiloh, Perryville and Murfreesboro, constantly by my side, ever ready, active and intelligent in the communication of orders or the rallying of a broken line. When the army of Tennessee had invested the Federal forces under Rosecrans at Chattanooga, the Florida regiments theretofore in Trigg's and Stovall's brigades were transferred to a new brigade, organized Novembe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.55 (search)
John M. Dunlap, and Robert Barton. Privates. William H. Adair, John McD. Alexander, Cornelius Armentrout, Henry Armentrout, Henry Arnold, John Armentrout, Samuel Agnor, Harry Arnold, William Barger, John P. Bowlin, William Bowlin, Elihu H. Barclay, Adam Bare, George Bare, E. P. Buckner, William Brockenbrough, George H. Cameron, J. H. Cameron, William Campbell, Daniel Crigler, Norborne Chandler, S. T. Chandler, Robert Cooper, Frank Cummings, Givens B. Davidson, Robert G. Davidson, William Davidson, George D. Dixon, John J. Dixon, S. K. Dunlap, John Davidson, George Williams Effinger, Adolphus Elhart, James S. Figgat, Charles M. Figgat, John A. Fisher, Robert K. Floyd, Samuel B. Fuller, Robert Ford, John Gilbert, Ezekiel Gilbert, Andrew Glover, Samuel Goul, S. McD. Gold, E. L. Graham, D. R. B. Greenlee, James S. Greenlee, Marshall Greenlee, William Wood Greenlee, Lucian P. Grigsby, John W. Gold, A. J. Gilmore, James Gold, Augustus Hanger, John G. Hamilton, W. W. Hamilton, G. Boyd
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
thers. With General Frank Nash our kinsfolk went to death at Germantown, in the long ago. With Mad Anthony Wayne they went to that desperate bayonet charge at Stony Point; with Jethro Sumner at Eutaw Springs; with Morgan and Greene; with Davie, Davidson and Graham; with Hogan at Charleston-wherever duty called or danger was to be dared they were to be found until the end of that long struggle which ended successfully for them. Well, the swift years flew by, and in 1861 our State, whose behest ome uncorighteous brother denounce us as rebels and brand as treason political belief and acts older than our government itself, we may point to the tombs of the Revolutionary patriots, Francis Nash and Joseph Warren, of Edward Buncombe and William Davidson, who taught us rebellion—and died in teaching us—and make answer: Every tree is known by his own fruit. The land that gave the rebels George Washington and Patrick Henry, Richard Caswell and Jethro Sumner to lead and counsel the men whom we
and running from the watch, being small, was remanded to his master to be punished. --Thomas Linton, charged with breaking open the wardrobe of Elizabeth Annsker and stealing $230 in C. S. Treasury notes and specie, was examined and remanded for examination before the Hustings Court on the 16th inst.--David, slave of James H. Grant, was ordered 39 lashes for breaking into a room in Anthony Ellis's house, occupied by Nat, slave of William Greanor, and stealing twenty dollars.--The case of Wm. Davidson, charged with attempting to commit a robbery at the American Hotel on Monday night, was continued until Friday. --Lydia, slave of Wm. Whip, was committed to jail as a runaway.--Sarah, slave of Dr. Petit, charged with assaulting and beating a child of Sallie Collins's, and abusing the latter, was ordered to be whipped. John Dwyer and Wm. H. Murphy, charged with swindling John C. Gholson out of $500, were disposed of; Dwyer going into a good company as a substitute, according to his origin