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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
t which occupied for a time a portion of the enemy's intrenchments beyond the swamp. He speaks of Captain F. F. Lovill, Co. A, Acting-Major, and his Adjutant R. S. Folger as having acted very gallantly throughout this engagement. Lieutenant-Colonel Wm. Lee Davidson, commanding the Seventh regiment, while gallantly encouraging his men on the left, fell into the hands of the enemy when the flank of his regiment was thrown into confusion. Captain Jno. G. Knox, commanding the corps of sharpshoot Fain, Company, C; Lieutenant J. W. Tate, Company F; Lieutenant W. L. White, Company I; Lieutenant J. G. Rencher, Company K. Thirty-seventh Regiment--Lieutenant J. W. Cochrane, Company D. Officers missing. Seventh Regiment--Lieutenant-Colonel W. L. Davidson, Captain J. G. Knox, Company A; Captain W. G. McRae, Company C; Lieutenant S. L. Hayman, Company E. Twenty-eighth Regiment--Lieutenant E. Hurley, Company E. Respectfully, James H. Lane. Major Jos. A. Engelhard, A. A. G., Wilcox'
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's divisionYorktown and Williamsburg. (search)
were no operations until late in the afternoon, when an affair took place, which might have proved very serious had the Federal Commander, General Sumner, been aggressive or appreciated that he possessed great superiority in numbers. About noon General Sumner had ordered General Hancock, with five regiments and a battery The Sixth and Seventh Maine, Fifth Wisconsin, Thirty-third New York, and Forty-ninth Pennsylvania regiments, and Coner's New York battery of six guns. from his own, and Davidson's brigades of Smith's division, to make a wide detour towards the York river, and take a position upon the Confederate flank. Crossing Cub Dam Creek, General Hancock came upon the line of redans before mentioned, as extending across the Peninsula, and finding the two nearest the York unoccupied, he took possession of them and of a strong natural position on a commanding ridge between them, and having sent for reinforcements opened with his battery upon the two redans between him and Fort M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.44 (search)
Gibbon, J. F. McRee, Ed. G. Higginbotham, Wesley M. Campbell, George E. Trescot. Seventh regiment. Colonels: Reuben P. Campbell, Ed. Graham Haywood, William Lee Davidson. Lieutenant-Colonels: Ed. Graham Haywood, Junius L. Hill, Wm. Lee Davidson, J. McLeod Turner. Majors: Edward D. Hall, Junius L. Hill, Robert S. Young, Wm. Lee Davidson, J. McLeod Turner. Majors: Edward D. Hall, Junius L. Hill, Robert S. Young, Robert B. McRae, Wm. Lee Davidson, J. McLeod Turner, James G. Harris. Adjutants: J. A. Cunningham, John E. Brown, Frank D. Stockton, Ives Smedes, John M. Pearson. Quartermasters; William A. Eliason, John Hughes. Commissaries: William H. Sanford, Thos. Hall McKoy. Surgeon: Wesley M. Campbell. Assistant Surgeons: WillWm. Lee Davidson, J. McLeod Turner, James G. Harris. Adjutants: J. A. Cunningham, John E. Brown, Frank D. Stockton, Ives Smedes, John M. Pearson. Quartermasters; William A. Eliason, John Hughes. Commissaries: William H. Sanford, Thos. Hall McKoy. Surgeon: Wesley M. Campbell. Assistant Surgeons: William Ed. White, Alfred W. Wiseman, J. R. Fraley. Chaplain: M. M. Marshall. Eighteenth regiment. Colonels: James D. Radcliffe, Robert H. Cowan, Thomas J. Purdie, John D. Barry. Lieutenant-Colonels: O. P. Meares, Thomas J. Purdie, Forney George, John W. McGill. Majors: George Tait, Forney George, R. M. DeVane, John D. Ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the war. (search)
ollow me. Without hesitation, they jumped the the fence, and at the corner of the court-house lot on the sidewalk leading from the church to the hotel, I, without the slightest knowledge of tactics, commenced to form them into two files. I had nearly completed my work, when hearing a disturbance at the head of the column, I walked rapidly up the line to hear what was the matter. Nearing the head of the column, I heard Lieutenant-Colonel Ewell, in his impetuous way, say to one of the men (Davidson), What, sir, do you dispute my authority? To which the young man, in a very proper manner replied, I do sir, until I know you have a right to exercise it. Taking in the situation, and aware that The Rifles and this officer were strangers to each other, I at once said, Men, this is Lieutenant-Colonel Ewell, your commanding officer, a gallant soldier, in whom you may place every confidence. Of course this ended the trouble. The men might well be excused for doubting Colonel Ewell, for whe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the First battle of Manassas. (search)
rrative of the personal incidents of the battle of the Seven Pines, the bloodiest fight, as far as my command was concerned, in which I ever was engaged. Relative losses. Colonel Evans began the fight with the subjoined force and lost during the day as follows:  Officers killed.Men killed.Officers wounded.Men wounded.Aggregate. Fourth South Carolina, Col. Sloan11097090 First Louisiana Battalion, Maj. Wheat 853346 Company Cavalry, Capt. Terry 1 12 Artillery, two guns, Lieut. Davidson   11  11914105139 Force estimated at 1,300 men. The above command was relieved by General Bee's Brigade, consisting of  Officers killed.Men killed.Officers wounded.Men wounded.Aggregate. Seventh Georgia, Col. Barton11812122153 Eighth Georgia, Col.------3386153200 Fourth Alabama, Col. Jones4366151197 Second Mississippi, Col. Falkner421379107 Two companies, Mississippi, Maj. Liddell 7 2128  1212027526685 2,800 muskets. Colonel Hampton's Legion fought through t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
Tennessee, (Prov. Army.) 7th Tennessee. 14th Tennessee. Thomas's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. E. L. Thomas. 14th Georgia. 19th Georgia. In Archer's brigade August 9th, according to his report of Cedar Run or Slaughter Mountain, and in Thomas's brigade August 30th, according to Surgeon Guild's report of casualties. 35th Georgia. 45th Georgia. 49th Georgia. Artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Walker. Braxton's Virginia Battery, (Fredericksburg Artillery.) Crenshaw's Virginia Battery. Davidson's Virginia Battery, (Letcher Artillery.) Latham's North Carolina, (Branch Artillery.) McIntosh's South Carolina Battery, (Pee Dee Artillery.) Pegram's Virginia Battery, (Purcell Artillery.) Ewell's division. Major-General R. S. Ewell. Brigadier-General A. R. Lawton. Lawton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. A. R. Lawton. Colonel M. Douglass. 13th Georgia. 26th Georgia. 31st Georgia. 38th Georgia. 60th Georgia. 61st Georgia. Early's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. J. A. Early. 13th Virginia. 25th
y President Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Va.: Sir,—Upon further inquiry as to the shortest and safest route via Newby's Bridge) by which Major-General Whiting could travel, with his small force, to this point, it was found he would require two days to reach here, the distance being at least thirty-four miles, with roads in a bad condition, owing to the prevailing rains. In a telegram of this morning he expresses his fears of an immediate attack upon him by the enemy. At the same time Captain Davidson, of the navy, informs me that a large fleet of gunboats and transports of the enemy are about four miles below Chaffin's Bluff, probably to reinforce Butler and make a combined attack by land and water. Under these circumstances, and in view of the fact that the enemy is diligently employed in erecting batteries and rifle-pits around this place, further delay might be fatal to success; and I have determined to attack him to-morrow morning with the forces at present available here, in
rals found themselves obstructed from direct advance or retreat. These batteries also played into the crater itself, where the shells were dropped with such precision upon the huddled mass of Federals that numbers of them preferred to run the gauntlet back to their lines. Wright's battery of four guns, admirably situated and protected, on the left of Elliott's salient, poured its whole volume of fire, with astonishing rapidity and effect, directly into their right flank; while one gun of Davidson's battery, in Wise's line, threw its canister and grape at short range into their left flank, both batteries, as occasion required, sweeping the ground in front of the crater. Major Haskell's battery of four 8 and 10 inch mortars, under Captain Lamkin, in rear on the Jerusalem plank road, and one Coehorn and two 12-pounder mortars of Lamkin's, in the ravine, about 200 yards to the left and rear of the crater, and two 8-inch mortars, were served with unremitting and fatal execution; while a
ble effect on the enemy's forces, no doubt greatly astonished and demoralized them. One gun of Davidson's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Otey, occupied a position on the right of the Baxter road, o two guns of—battery, near the junction of the Jerusalem plank road and Baxter road; one gun of Davidson's battery, on left of Wise's brigade, and two mortar batteries. The assailing force of the ethe breach and fled precipitately to the rear, while the left of Wise's brigade, and one gun of Davidson's battery, poured their fire, at a distance of from one hundred and fifty to five hundred yards W. Brent, A. A. G.: Enemy Tangipahoa this A. M. for Mobile, two brigades cavalry under General Davidson, eighty-seven wagons, eight wagons bearing pontoon-train. Urge Clanton's brigade to Meridiowly, and eastward. Estimate at four thousand (4000), and seven (7) pieces of artillery. Wm. Lee Davidson. Telegram. Danville, April 4th, 1865. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Please giv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph (search)
. William Jones, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—I was severely wounded in the second battle at Cold Harbor, but returned to my command about the last of August, to find a great many of my officers absent, on account of the numerous engagements and hard fighting in that campaign. The compilation of the War Records Office, is doubtless true, but it does not give the names of the real regimental commanders in my brigade at that time. They were as follows: Seventh North Carolina, Colonel William Lee Davidson. Do not know why he was absent. Eighteenth North Carolina, Colonel John D. Barry, who was absent, wounded in one of the numerous engagements on the north side of the James. Twenty-eighth North Carolina, Colonel William H. A. Speer, who was absent, mortally wounded at Reams's Station August 25th. Thirty-third North Carolina, Colonel R. V. Coward. I do not remember why he was absent. I know that he was with me in the battle of Jones's Farm, September 30th, and behaved with
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