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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 49 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 30 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 29 3 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 10 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Davidson or search for Davidson in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
eived no orders; therefore, I have not had the honor to participate in any of the many engagements for the protection of our capital. Several field-batteries were brought in, one or two at a time, upon both flanks, but each was quickly overwhelmed. The artillery under D. H. Hill, which had been engaged at White Oak Swamp the afternoon of the 30th, had entirely exhausted its ammunition and been sent to the rear to replenish. In the demand for guns, A. P. Hill sent two of his batteries, Davidson's and Pegram's. Pegram had been engaged in every battle, beginning with Mechanicsville. Including Malvern Hill, he had 60 casualties out of 80 men, and was only able to man a single gun at the close. This fighting, the artillery part of the action, began about noon and continued until about half-past 3 o'clock. D. H. Hill thus describes that in his front, — Instead of ordering up 100 of 200 pieces of artillery to play on the Yankees, a single battery, Moorman's, was ordered up, and kn
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
n italics arrived too late for the battle. HoodLaw, Robertson, Benning, Jenkins, Names in italics arrived too late for the battle. Anderson Names in italics arrived too late for the battle. Res. Arty.BatteriesWilliams, 4; Robertson, 5; Alexander, 6 Names in italics arrived too late for the battle.9 Total Inf. and Arty., 33 Brigades, 174 Guns. Effective total 52,066 WheelerWhartonO'Rews, Harrison1 CavalryMartinMorgan, Russell1 ForrestArmstrongWheeler, Dibbfell2 CavalryPegramDavidson, Scott2 Total Cavalry, 8 Brigades, 24 Guns. Effective total, 14,260 Unlike the armies in Va., which had never considered themselves defeated, our Western army had never gained a decided victory. Naturally, therefore, Lee enjoyed both the affection and confidence of his men, while there was an absence of much sentiment toward Bragg. It did not, however, at all affect the quality of the fighting, as shown by the casualties suffered at Chickamauga, which were 25 per cent by the Confederate
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
of Wise's brigade and two of Ransom's were brought up from the left. With their aid, the situation was made safe and held until about 10 A. M., when Mahone arrived at the head of three brigades of his corps, drawn from the lines on our right. A regiment of Hoke's from the left also came up later. In the meantime, a few of our guns had found themselves able to fire with great effect upon the enemy massed in front of our lines. The left gun in the next salient to the right, occupied by Davidson's battery, was in an embrasure which flanked the Pegram Salient, but was not open to any gun on the enemy's line. This gun did fearful execution, being scarcely 400 yards distant. It was fired by Maj. Gibbes commanding the battalion, for perhaps 40 rounds, until he was badly wounded, after which it was served by Col. Huger and Haskell, Winthrop, and Mason of my staff, and later by some of Wise's infantry. A hot fire was turned upon it, but it was well protected and could never be kept sil