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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Henry Eugene Davies or search for Henry Eugene Davies in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
leg, I lay on the field and the Emperor himself pinned the cross on my breast! I could not help thinking what a pity it was that the wounds had not been higher up, whereby the Emperor would have been saved the expense of a cross, and I the trouble of listening to his stories. These two brave bucks were travelling on their good looks, having got down, the Lord knows how, with no letters to anybody; yet they dined with General Meade, and passed the night in camp; passed another night at General Davies', and, the last I heard of them, were pledging General Hancock in the national whiskey! . . . I omitted to mention a third ornament to military life, a gent with eagles on his shoulders, who, on enquiry, turned out to be a brother militia man, and a great credit to the service, as he perilled his life daily. in the state of New York, as General Sanford's aide (commanding state militia), and now was visiting the army to see that justice was done to deserving non-commissioned officers in
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
ule meat to some of our prisoners, during this campaign, to keep them alive till they could get to supplies; and some of our own men have gone very hungry, because, in the haste of pursuit, they marched straight away from the waggons. . . . At 1.30 we found General Sheridan at the house, which was perhaps a mile south of Jetersville. Along the front was the 5th Corps, strongly entrenched, while the cavalry covered the flanks. A little before three, Sheridan rode off to the left, to help in Davies whom the enemy's infantry was trying to cut off. Before this, at two, the head of the 2d Corps was up and the troops went rapidly into position; for, a couple of hours later, Mr. Sheridan (and still more his officers) had a stampede that Lee was coming on top of us. For once in my life I will say I knew better than that, and laughed the cavalry Staff to scorn; for I was dead certain it was only a demonstration, to protect their trains and find our strength. In truth they never came even in
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
ig, John Neville, 244. Crawford, Samuel Wylie, 89, 169, 181, 234, 242, 253, 279, 299, 316, 331; portrait, 312. Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas, 116, 128. Crow, —, 172. Cullum, George Washington, 223. Culpeper, Va., cavalry raid, 16. Cummings house, 321. Curtis, Arthur Russell, 318. Custer, George Armstrong, 77, 189; described, 17. Dabney's Mill, 330, 333. Dahlgren, John Adolph, 290. Dalton, Edward Barry, 90, 184, 210, 216. Dana, Charles Anderson, want of tact, 126. Davies, Henry Eugene, Jr., 253, 347. Dead, care for the, 48. Deatonsville, fight at, 349, 351. Delafield, Richard, 290. De Ray, —, 205. Devereux, John H., 4. Dickinson, —, 13. Division, moving a, 184. Doyle, Sir, Charles Hastings, 244. Draft, quality of, 209. Draper, Simeon, 249. Dresser, George Warren, 253. Duane, James Chatham, 196n, 223, 257, 260, 289, 291, 293, 306, 339. Dutch Gap canal, 213, 233, 282. Earle, William, lieutenant-colonel, 49. Early, Jubal Anderson, 182, 185n,<