hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Levi Carlton; died at home. William B. Carlton; living. Ira Carlton; died at hospital. Junius A. Davis; died at home. Joseph A. Davis; living. Albert Davis; died at home. Robert D. Diggs; living. John Donavan; living. Joseph S. Estis; dead. Frank B. Estis; died at Eimira, N. Y. Archy H. Eubank; livil General Milroy's force at Winchester, in June, 1863, which resulted in their total defeat and the capture of about four thousand in all. Milroy, outlawed by President Davis, escaping with a few hundred cavalry. Major Goldsborough, reconnoitering, was one of the first officers with a detachment to enter the town. In the battlethe volunteers. The march through the city was rapid, and the troops were protected on either flank by files of policemen. The mob sang Dixie, cheered for Jeff. Davis and the Confederacy, and while the troops were getting into the cars at Mount Clare, there was pandemonium, and two bricks were hurled at them. But the train pull
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
nded at Johns Island; living. James M. Cardwell; died at Plarisburg, June 15, 1864. George W. Cawthorn; living. John Colly; died at home. James Colly; living. Charles Collier; died at home. Frank Carter; died at home. Robert Carter; died at home. W. S. Courtney, captured at Petersburg, June 15, 1864; living. Levi Carlton; died at home. William B. Carlton; living. Ira Carlton; died at hospital. Junius A. Davis; died at home. Joseph A. Davis; living. Albert Davis; died at home. Robert D. Diggs; living. John Donavan; living. Joseph S. Estis; dead. Frank B. Estis; died at Eimira, N. Y. Archy H. Eubank; living. Dunbar Edwards; died at hospital. Alfred Edwards; killed at Petersburg, June 15, 1864. John H. Eager; living. Richard Garrett; died at Elmira, N. Y. Thomas C. Garrett, captured at Petersburg, June 15, 1864; died at home. Augustus Garrett; living. John Gaines; died at home. Ben. Groom; died at hospital.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
hortly afterward elected major, under Lieutenant-Colonel James R. Herbert, who had been Captain of Company D, in the First Maryland. Under these brave veterans as field officers, with much active service, the new Maryland battalion soon became a magnificent fighting phalanx. This regiment was in the flank attack upon the Federal General Milroy's force at Winchester, in June, 1863, which resulted in their total defeat and the capture of about four thousand in all. Milroy, outlawed by President Davis, escaping with a few hundred cavalry. Major Goldsborough, reconnoitering, was one of the first officers with a detachment to enter the town. In the battle of Gettysburg, the Second Maryland, in General George H. Steuart's brigade, Johnson's division, participated with conspicuous valor and suffered dreadfully. They helped carry the enemy's advanced works on Culp's Hill on the evening of the second day—July 2, 1863—the ascent being over huge rocks and other serious obstructions; yet
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
nder intense excitement, met the troops at Bolton Station and followed them to Mount Clare. All the way there was a riotous demonstration. Marshal Kane was there with 120 policemen, and while he succeeded in preventing any serious breaches of the peace, he could not stop the mouths of the people, who hissed, jerred and ridiculed the volunteers. The march through the city was rapid, and the troops were protected on either flank by files of policemen. The mob sang Dixie, cheered for Jeff. Davis and the Confederacy, and while the troops were getting into the cars at Mount Clare, there was pandemonium, and two bricks were hurled at them. But the train pulled out at 4 o'clock without any really serious trouble. Opposing sentiment. In the meantime the population of Baltimore was in a very feverish condition. The Southern rights men raised a large Confederate flag at the intersection of Greenmount avenue and Chase street and fired a salute of 100 guns in its honor. But the symp