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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
lship exhibited by any Federal commander than General Thomas' defence of Nashville. We note with pleasure the dignified rebuke with which Mr. Van Horne censures the devastation of South Carolina by General Sherman. There is a wide difference between the sympathies of Chaplain Van Horne and our own regarding the war and its leading actors, and it will be excused in us to feel that he is sometimes too pronounced in his admiration of his heroes, and that occasionally, as in the cases of Mr. Davis and of General Polk, he shows too strongly his partisan feelings. But he has brought to the work he has so well accomplished an earnest purpose to write history from the most authentic documents attainable. He is generally fair in his statements of forces, though he does much overstate ours in the Battle of Chickamauga. He has adopted the plan throughout the work of having an appendix to every chapter, made up of official letters, orders and dispatches in support of the narrative
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.36 (search)
ike. We pursued the enemy about four miles, during a heavy, drenching rain, amidst mud and slush, across cornfields, fences, ditches and creeks, but were unable to overtake them, and halted about three miles from Bunker Hill. It rained incessantly during the night, and prevented our sleeping very soundly. September 6th No change of position to-day. September 7th We hear heavy skirmishing on the Millwood road, and are ordered to be ready for action. Adjutant Gayle and Sergeant-Major Bruce Davis keep busy carrying such orders from company to company. The Richmond papers bring us the sad news of the fall of Atlanta. It grieves us much. Atlanta is between us and our homes. It is only seventy miles from where my dearly loved mother and sisters live, and all mail communication with them is now cut off. It pains and distresses me to think that La Grange and Greeneville, Georgia, may be visited by raiding parties, and my relatives and friends annoyed and insulted by the cowa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
forward to support our cavalry, marching parallel with the pike. We pursued the enemy about four miles, during a heavy, drenching rain, amidst mud and slush, across corn fields, fences, ditches and creeks, but were unable to overtake them, and halted about three miles from Bunker Hill. It rained incessantly during the night, and prevented our sleeping very soundly. We hear very heavy skirmishing on the Millwood road, and are ordered to be ready for action. Adjutant Gayle and Sergeant Major Bruce Davis keep busy carrying such orders from company o company. The Richmond papers bring us news of the fall of Atlanta. It grieves us much. Atlanta is between us and our homes. It is only seventy miles from where my dearly loved mother and sisters live, and all mail communication with them is now cut off. It pains and distresses me to think that La Grange and Greenville, Ga., may be visited by raiding parties, and my relatives and friends annoyed and insulted by the cruel Yankees, as