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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
nt wrote: They have our memoirs, and, Mr. Fox tells me, are at them. We are to see the Secretary, Mr. Welles, to-night, at our request, to talk over cur labors. . . . [July 26th.] Last night our conference had a meeting with the Secretary of the Navy and Mr. Fox, when the subject of the expeditions Brevet Major-General Thomas W. Sherman. From a photographe. was entered into. The Cabinet had our papers again. [July 28th.] I sat up last night in the Navy Department until eleven, with Charles Davis, to prepare for this meeting, by condensing into notes the pith of our reports, and to read them to the board when called upon; but General Meigs seemed to desire that our full reports should be read, which I could not, of course, ask to be done, without seeming to attach too much importance to them. General Scott said at the conclusion, they were of singular ability, and he adopted every word of them; and General Totten told me there was not a criticism made. The meeting consisted of
oral Mathew W. Clexton, musician Marcus H. Perry, and privates Jacob Becker, Chas. Davis, Peter Hussey, Dan Nellis, Patrick H. McNamee, Thos. Maronie, Robt. Russell,lion of the Seventh Pennsylvania, and two companies of Third Kentucky, under Capt. Davis, were posted in the woods near and to the right of the Fourth Michigan, withne, I found our entire right flank had given way. Learning from some men of General Davis's division the position of the enemy's cavalry, I made a turn to the right,ster at short-range, until Gen. Sheridan's division was completely flanked by Gen. Davis's division retreating, and obliged to retire. Woe fixed prolonges and retiremy rifles drove two of the enemy's pieces from position, which were firing on Gen. Davis's retreating lines. Lost one caisson in reaching this position, every horse by midnight. In all of these marches we had been preceded by the divisions of Davis and Negley, and perhaps by others belonging to Thomas's or the centre corps. T
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers, and soldiers who died as prisoners. (search)
Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Oct. 4, 1864. Danton, C.,28th Mass. Inf.,Lost on transport Gen. Lyon,--- Darning, Edward,*39th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Jan. 4, 1864. Davidson, John Name and rank.Command.Place of Death.Date of Death. Davidson, John,1st Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,--- Davidson, John,22d Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Feb. 11, 1864. Davidson, W.,*1st Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 18, 1864. Davidson, Wardrop,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Nov. 16, 1864. Davis, Charles,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 20, 1864. Davis, Charles A.,58th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 29, 1864. Davis, Edward S.,39th Mass. Inf.,Wilmington, N. C.,March 30, 1865. Davis, George H., Sergt.,26th Mass. Inf.,Annapolis, Md.,March 19, 1865. Davis, Jeffrey G., Sergt.,58th Mass. Inf.,Danville, Va.,Feb. 25, 1865. Davis, Moses S.,1st Mass. H. A.,Annapolis, Md.,April 1, 1865. Davis, Thomas B.,1st Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,May 31, 1864. Davis, Wareham G.,36th Mass.
Davidson, John Name and rank.Command.Place of Death.Date of Death. Davidson, John,1st Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,--- Davidson, John,22d Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Feb. 11, 1864. Davidson, W.,*1st Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 18, 1864. Davidson, Wardrop,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Nov. 16, 1864. Davis, Charles,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 20, 1864. Davis, Charles A.,58th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 29, 1864. Davis, Edward S.,39th Mass. Inf.,Wilmington, N. C.,March 30, 1865. Davis, George H., Sergt.,26th Mass. Inf.,Annapolis, Md.,March 19, 1865. Davis, Jeffrey G., Sergt.,58th Mass. Inf.,Danville, Va.,Feb. 25, 1865. Davis, Moses S.,1st Mass. H. A.,Annapolis, Md.,April 1, 1865. Davis, Thomas B.,1st Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,May 31, 1864. Davis, Wareham G.,36th Mass. Inf.,Annapolis, Md.,July 10, 1864. Davyson, W.,*7th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 16, 1864. Dawson, Stephen W.,3d Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,--- Day, Abra
venport, B. F., 351 Davenport, E. C., 351 Davenport, P. B., 351 David, Anthony, 491 David, Edward, 351 Davidson, John, 1st Mass. H. A., 510 Davidson, John, 22d Mass. Inf., 510 Davidson, R. C., 451 Davidson, W., 510 Davidson, Wardrop, 510 Davis, A. A., 120. 451 Davis, A. M., 351 Davis, Benjamin, 15th Mass. Inf., 352 Davis, Benjamin, 20th Mass. Inf., 352 Davis, Benjamin, 22d Mass. Inf., 120, 352 Davis, C. A., 510 Davis, C. H., 41, 42, 43 Davis, C. H., 27th Mass. Inf., 352 Davis, Charles, 510 Davis, David, 352 Davis, E. S., 510 Davis, Freeman, 436 Davis, G. A., 352 Davis, G. F., 130, 352 Davis, G. H., 510 Davis, G. L., 451 Davis, G. R., 352 Davis, G. T., 81 Davis, G. W., 451 Davis, George, 451 Davis, H. A., 451 Davis. H. F., 65 Davis, J. G., 510 Davis, J. H., 352 Davis, J. J. P., 451 Davis, J. M., 352 Davis, James, 37th Mass. Inf., 352 Davis, James, 55th Mass. Inf., 352 Davis, L. M., 352 Davis, Levi, 352 Davis, Lorenzo, 352 Davis, M. S., 510 Dav
List of Visitors to West point. --1. John J. Crittenden, Frankfort, Ky.; 2. Andrew Johnson, Greenville, Tenn.; 3. Edward D. Bell, Salem, Oregon; 4. John M. Botts, Richmond, Va.; 5. David Davis, Bloomington, III.; 6. David Cooper, St. Paul, Minnesota; 7. John Woodruff, New Haven, Conn,; 8. James S. Albans, Wisconsin; 9. Frederick P. Stanton, Kansas; 10. Alexander Cummings, Penn.; 11. Thomas J. McKean, Lowa; 12. Richard Tilghman, Maryland; 13. James G. Blaine, Maine; 14. Herman Haunt, Deerfield, Mass.; 15. Professor Charles Davis, N.Y.; 16.Gen. H. B. Carrington, Ohio; 17. Brig. Gen. John Garland, U.S. Army.
The Daily Dispatch: may 7, 1861., [Electronic resource], The British press on American Affairs. (search)
Treachery in Maryland. The noble State of Maryland has been thus far paralyzed by the treason of Gov. Hicks and Henry Winter Davis, two matchless political villains who have succeeded in surpassing the infamy of Benedict Arnold, and inscribing their names in the very lowest and blackest spot in the record of human infamy. If ever men deserved the gallows, each of these traitors to the South deserves to be swung as high as Haman. The man who can think of party at a time when the liberty and independence of his State is threatened, is a wretch too vile to live; at any rate, to live among loyal and honest men. If a State falls bravely fighting and doing its best, there is some consolation in the reflection that all the powers God has given it have been employed to the best effect; but to be struck down from its pride of place, to see its ardor dampened, its energies distracted, its resources sapped and mined, by a secret, insidious, interior foe, what can fill a generous soul with
Singular Narrative. The Chicago Times, of a recent date publishes a long letter over the signature of J. Wesley Green, an ornamental painter of Pittsburg, Pa., in which the professes to have been the bearer of peace propositions from President Davis to the Yankee Government at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his intnt at Washington. He says that the reason of his selection for this service by the Southern President, was because of an acquaintance formed with the latter during the war with Mexico. He gives a full account of his interview with President Davis and says that during the interview he was rested most cordially. It seems, however, that Mr. J. Wesley Green has not sustained a very reputable character at home, as he has not long been out of the Penitentiary, where he served a three years term.
d to the American coast. She is a sharp, side wheel steamer, 1.350 tons, and very fast; in painted lead color all over. Whalers Burned. The ship Carolina, which arrived at New York Thursday evening last, from Buchos Ayres spoke the whaling bark Gertrade on the 6th of November bound up the river DePlata. The Captain of the Gertrude reported the burning of several whalers by the Alabama. From Fortress Monroe. Old Point Dec. 17. --It is rumored here that J. C. Jones, Charles Davis. D. W. Curtis, Mr. Phillips, and one other, have been captured by the rebels while on their way from Norfolk to Elizabeth City. They had goods to the amount of $20,000 on board a schooner in tow down the canal. What the Yankees thought before the battle of Fredericksburg--the War to be Decided on that day, and the Star spangled banner to Float over Richmond. For the amusement of our readers we copy the two following editorials from the Philadelphian Inquirer, of Thursday. The
Capture of a blockade schooner. --The Tallahassee Floridian states that on the 28th ult the schooner Caroline Gertrude, with cotton, in attempting to run out through the blockade, was captured. Messrs. L. R. Styner, Jas. Tulen, Theo. Ball, and Chas. Davis, all citizens of Tallahassee, were on board and taken prisoners.
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