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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 53 11 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 5 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Charles H. Davis or search for Charles H. Davis in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
ety of the expedition was by no means assured. The bar or shoalest water at the entrance of Port Royal extended ten miles out to sea. All buoys and other guides to the navigator had been removed. As soon as the flag-ship came to anchor Captain C. H. Davis, Chief of Staff, and Assistant Boutelle of the Coast Survey, proceeded in search of the channel, which by three P. M. was sounded out and buoyed, and before dark the smaller naval vessels and the transports were anchored in Port Royal Roadese particulars we must refer the reader to the official reports of the day, since this is intended to be a general review of naval events and cannot enter into all the particulars. Flag Officer Dupont highly commends the services of Fleet-Captain C. H. Davis, Commander C. R. P. Rodgers,and some of the subordinate officers of the flag-ship; but leaves it to the commanding officers of vessels to mention the personnel of their own ships. The first thing to be done after the capture of the f
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
shells committed some havoc among them on this occasion; nor did they ever attempt to obtain a lodgment on Port Royal Island, which remained in possession of the government during the war. A reconnoissance up the Tybee River was made by Captain C. H. Davis and Commander C. R. P. Rodgers with the Ottawa, Seneca, Ellen, Western World, and the armed launches of the Wabash, accompanied by three transports, having on board 2,400 troops, commanded by Brigadier General H. G. Wright. The expeditioness he is well supported by his officers; and as Dupont up to this time had been everywhere successful, we must give a portion of the credit to those who served under his command. That Dupont was fortunate in his selection, the names of Captain C. H. Davis, Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Parrott, Steedman, Gillis, Prentiss, Lieutenants-Commanding Balch, Stevens, Ammen, Nicholson, Truxton, Rhind, Bankhead, Conroy,Watmough, Budd, Semmes and Phoenix, in command of ve
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
rt Royal and Seabrook Ferry. Confederates dispersed. effect of co-operation of the Army and Navy. reports of officers of the fleet. expedition of fleet Captain C. H. Davis to Warsaw Sound. regiments accompanying expedition. Tatnall's gunboats open fire on Union fleet and get worsted. excitement in savannah. officers who weright, namely, to do all the fighting while the staff were attending to what might be considered their legitimate duties. Hence we find the Fleet-Captain, Charles H. Davis, getting underway on January 26, 1862, for an expedition into Warsaw Sound. He had under his command the gunboats Ottawa, Lieut.-Commanding Stevens; Seneca, composing Commodore Tatnall's squadron attempted to pass down the river with some scows in tow. Commander John Rodgers, who lay at anchor in Wright River, and Captain Davis opened fire upon them, which they returned with spirit. The result of the engagement, which lasted less than half an hour, was that Commodore Tatnall and one
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
active service, never again to resume it, and the command of the squadron devolved upon Capt. Charles H. Davis, a gallant officer, well qualified for this important duty. The sudden withdrawal of . H. Foote, Flag-officer. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Flag-officer Davis assumed command of the squadron on the 9th of May, 1862, and had little time for reflectioon, where she also sunk. The incidents of this engagement are so lightly passed over by Flag-officer Davis, that it is difficult to get much information from the official reports. The enemy's sidew enough to be satisfied that victory remained with the Federal squadron. The report of Flag-officer Davis was of course intended to represent the true position of the vessels, but he was new to thless and enterprising enemy, who had a flotilla well equipped for the purpose intended. Flag-officer Davis had the satisfaction of winning the first naval squadron fight, and certainly deserved the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
e reaching the point intended to be struck. Davis determined to have no more surprises, and two illow, which they found to be abandoned. Capt. Davis sent for Col. Fitch U. S. A. and turned oveneglected to make the destruction Rear-Admiral Chas. H. Davis complete and retired with their usuts in order of battle, under the lead of Flag-officer Davis, and opened a vigorous fire which was ketgomery, proved such formidable foes. Rear-Admiral Davis had no military authority over the ram f after their vessels had been deserted. Rear-Admiral Davis says: It is with pleasure that I call th enemy's country. For the second time Rear Admiral Davis won a strictly naval victory, and won itto know which is the correct version. Rear-Admiral Davis, in his report, makes no distinction amo whom he approved of, ever congratulated Rear-Admiral Davis and his officers for their brilliant suc the White River. On June 16th, 1862, Rear-Admiral Davis sent an expedition up the White River to[1 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
powerful co-operation of the Navy, commanded by yourself, this great result, under the providence of Almighty God, has been achieved. A slave empire, divided by this river into equal parts, with liberty in possession of its banks, and freedom upon its waters, cannot exist. The work of rescuing and setting free this noble artery, whose unrestricted vital current is essential to our nationality, commenced with such ability by the veteran Farragut and the lamented Foote, and continued by Davis, is near its consummation. You have only to proceed onward and meet that veteran chief whose first act was to dash through the gates by which the rebels assumed to bar the entrance to the Mississippi, whose free communication to and above New Orleans he has ever since proudly maintained. When the squadrons of the Upper and Lower Mississippi shall combine, and the noble river be again free to a united people, the nation will feel its integrity restored, and the names of the heroic champ
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
the Federal squadron from below Vicksburg and thereby cause the siege to be raised — while Haines' Bluff could block the way with its guns and the huge raft which filled up the Yazoo River for half a mile. The Confederates worked on their iron-clads without molestation, and even when General Grant had gained the rear of Vicksburg they relied on General J. E. Johnston's army to protect them while they completed the work on the rams. If the Arkansas, which ran the gauntlet of Farragut and Davis' squadrons, was a specimen of the iron-clad that could be built at Yazoo City, the Federals had cause to congratulate themselves that the Yazoo was open by the evacuation of Haines' Bluff, and the last attempt of the Confederates to carry on naval operations in that quarter abandoned. At the same time that the expedition was sent up the Yazoo another was dispatched up the Red River, ascending the Black and Tensas Rivers. Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge penetrated to the head of navigation
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
showing under fire in a foreign land. It gives me pleasure to mention him here as a gentleman of intelligence, of great worth, and of heartfelt devotion to his country. I have yet to speak of the chief of my staff and fleet-captain, Commander Charles H. Davis. In the organization of our large fleet before sailing, and in the preparation and systematic arrangement of the duties of our contemplated work — in short, in all the duties pertaining to the flag-officer--I have received his most valght hundred and eighty shells were fired from her guns, chiefly with 5-second fuses Some grape was fired with good effect from the 10-inch gun, in the latter part of the action. I have to thank that most brave and distinguished officer, Captain C. H. Davis, the captain of the fleet, for the aid he gave me when not engrossed by the important duties of his special station; and I desire to pay the same tribute to Commander John Rodgers, who, being a passenger on board, had volunteered to serve
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
showing under fire in a foreign land. It gives me pleasure to mention him here as a gentleman of intelligence, of great worth, and of heartfelt devotion to his country. I have yet to speak of the chief of my staff and fleet-captain, Commander Charles H. Davis. In the organization of our large fleet before sailing, and in the preparation and systematic arrangement of the duties of our contemplated work — in short, in all the duties pertaining to the flag-officer--I have received his most valght hundred and eighty shells were fired from her guns, chiefly with 5-second fuses Some grape was fired with good effect from the 10-inch gun, in the latter part of the action. I have to thank that most brave and distinguished officer, Captain C. H. Davis, the captain of the fleet, for the aid he gave me when not engrossed by the important duties of his special station; and I desire to pay the same tribute to Commander John Rodgers, who, being a passenger on board, had volunteered to serve
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
s, annihilating the illicit traffic in that quarter, and preventing all supplies from reaching the Confederate armies by way of the Florida coast. The duties of Rear-Admiral Farragut, in command of the West Gulf squadron, had been extremely harassing, but they gave that gallant officer an opportunity to exhibit the highest qualities as commander-inchief. Soon after the memorable battle below New Orleans and the surrender of that city, Farragut made a junction with the squadron of Flag-officer Davis above Vicksburg, and, had the Army contingent that was sent to support him been as large as it should have been, Farragut would have had the satisfaction of capturing Vicksburg. The military part of the expedition, however, though commanded by a most able and gallant general, was too small to effect anything by an attack on the city; and Farragut, after subjecting his squadron to the fire of the enemy's guns, which were daily increasing in number and power, and finding it was a mere w
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