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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 53 11 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 5 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Charles H. Davis or search for Charles H. Davis in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
picions of the Federal agents were aroused. But, though they were Remarkable photographs of Confederate rams. The Albemarle The Confederate ram lady Davis These pictures are remarkable as being among the scant remaining photographic evidence of the efforts made by the Confederacy to put a navy into actual exir. Next day she sank the Southfield. In the picture she is in Federal hands, having been raised after Cushing's famous exploit had put her hors du combat. The Lady Davis, formerly a tug, was purchased in Baltimore and was the first war-vessel to be put afloat by the State of South Carolina, March 13, 1861. She made several captrast with the huge sailing frigate whose wooden sides and many guns already belong to a past era. The efforts that brought such vessels as the Albemarle and the Lady Davis into the war marked the beginning of a new American navy. In these pictures both of these formidable vessels have been stripped. morally certain that the shi
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
is orders being simply to cooperate with Flag-Officer Davis and the flotilla. In fact, throughout tvessel was acquired at the suggestion of Flag-Officer Davis, who saw the necessity of light-draft gu an inch thick. When Admiral Porter succeeded Davis in the command of the Mississippi squadron, ituld pass by the batteries. On July 1st, Flag-Officer Davis' forces had joined those from the mouth much to the mortification of both Farragut and Davis, and to the great glory and honor of her commajoin Farragut, and the latter returned to join Davis' flotilla. It was fortunate that Farragut hft vessels he would have had to remain there. Davis withdrew his fleet to the mouth of the Yazoo ard the great ram blew up. When Farragut and Davis had parted company, the waterway from Vicksbur, which had been equipped at the suggestion of Davis, began to join the fleet in the early autumn. Davis employed his vessels on some minor expeditions up the Yazoo and other rivers, but 1862 close[1 more...]