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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 43 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 35 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 22 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 4 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 11 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 1 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
son and from illness. He carried with him the sympathy and regrets of all his command. He was succeeded by Flag-Officer Charles Henry Davis, a most excellent officer. This paper would not be complete without some account of the naval battles fouis to relieve the Mound City, which had been badly rammed by the Van Dorn. The smoke at this time was so Flag-officer Charles Henry Davis (afterward rear-admiral and chief of the Bureau of navigation). from a photograph. dense that we could hardlittle Rebel while they were above the Carondelet, and prevent their escape, if possible, I never could make out. Flag-Officer Davis says in his report: All of these vessels might easily have been captured if we had possessed the means of towing theffectively. The Queen of the West and Monarch were followed in line of battle by the gun-boats, under the lead of Flag-Officer Davis, and all of them opened fire, which was continued from the time we got within good range until the end of the battl
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Ellet and his steam-rams at Memphis. (search)
Secretary of War to hurry the rams forward at the earliest possible moment. In consequence of these demands, five of them were immediately dispatched down the river under my command, work upon them being continued as they proceeded and for several days after their arrival at Fort Pillow. The other rams followed, and about the 25th of May Colonel Ellet joined the fleet on board the Switzerland, and the ram-fleet was now ready for action. Colonel Ellet at once conferred with Flag-Officer Charles H. Davis on the propriety of passing Fort Pillow, and engaging the enemy's fleet wherever found. Flag-Officer Davis did not approve the plan suggested, but offered no objection to Colonel Ellet's trying the experiment. Accordingly, immediate preparations were begun for running the batteries with the entire ramfleet. During this period of preparation, constant watch was kept upon the fort and the enemy's fleet. On the night of the 4th of June I crossed the timber point in front of the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at New Madrid (Island number10), Fort Pillow, and Memphis. (search)
The total Confederate loss in killed and wounded is estimated at about 30. Of the number of Confederates captured the Confederate and Union reports range from 2000 to 7000, respectively. Union fleet at Fort Pillow, May 10TH, 1862. Capt. Charles Henry Davis, commanding pro tern. Benton (flagship), Lieut. S. L. Phelps; Carondelet, Comr. Henry Walke; Mound City, Comr. A. H. Kilty; Cincinnati, Comr. R. N. Stembel (w); St. Louis, Lieut. Henry Erben; Cairo, Lieut. N. C. Bryant; Pittsburgh, Lieut. Egbert Thompson. The Union loss as officially reported was: Cincinnati, wounded, 3 (1 mortally). Mound City, wounded, 1. Total, 4. Union fleet at Memphis, June 6TH, 1862. Flag-Officer Charles Henry Davis, commanding. Gun-boats--Benton (flagship), Lieut. S. L. Phelps; Louisville, Comr. B. M. Dove; Carondelet, Comr. Henry Walke; Cairo, Lieut. N. C. Bryant; St. Louis, Lieut. Wilson McGunnegle. Ram fleet-Queen of the West (flag-ship), Col. Charles Ellet, Jr.; Monarch, Lieut.-Col. Alfred
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
t frantic energy manifested itself at the North in raising troops and in the purchase and armament of vessels to blockade the thousands of miles of Southern coasts. Naturally, the Navy Department sought the advice of Professor Alexander D. Bache, Superintendent of the Coast Survey, and it was at his suggestion that the department secured a board of conference composed of Captain S. F. Du Pont, of the Navy, as President, and Major J. G. Barnard, U. S. Engineers, Professor Bache and Commander Charles H. Davis, U. S. Navy, as members. In a private letter Captain Du Pont wrote, on the 1st of June: It may be that I shall be ordered to Washington on some temporary duty, on a board to arrange a programme of blockade-first suggested by Professor Bache. The first memoir of the conference in the confidential letter-book of the Navy Department is written in pencil, has many erasures and interlineations, and is evidently the original draft of a paper, probably referred and never returned. I
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Port Royal, November 7th, 1861. (search)
The opposing forces at Port Royal, November 7th, 1861. The Union fleet, Flag-Officer S. F. Du Pont, commanding. Captain Charles Henry Davis, Fleet-Captain. Flag-ship: frigate Wabash (2 10-inch, 28 9-inch, 14 8-inch, 2 12-pounders), Commander C. R. P. Rodgers; sidewheel steamer Susquehanna (15 8-inch, 1 24-pounder, 2 12-pounders), Captain J. L. Lardner; sloop Mohican (2 11-inch, 4 32-pounders, I 12-pounder), Commander S. W. Godon; Seminole (1 11-inch, 4 32-pounders), Commander J. P. Gillis; Pocahontas (1 10-inch, 4 32-pounders), Commander Percival Drayton; Pawnee (8 9-inch, 2 12-pounders), Lieutenant R. H. Wyman; gun-boats Unadilla, Lieutenant Napoleon Collins; Seneca, Lieutenant Daniel Ammen; Ottawa, Lieutenant T. H. Stevens; Pembina, Lieutenant J. P. Bankhead (each of the four latter carried 1 11-inch, 1 20-pounder rifle, and 2 24-pounders); sailing sloop Vandalia (4 8-inch, 16 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder), Commander F. S. Haggerty; steamer Bienville (8 32--pounders, 1 30-pound
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
neral M. L. Smith. After this, for two weeks, things moved along at Vicksburg with something akin to monotony. The mortar-fleets kept up a steady bombardment, but even the citizens of the town became so accustomed to it that they went about their daily occupations. The women and children left their caves to watch the shells, and would only betake themselves to their shelters when the fire seemed to be concentrated in their particular neighborhoods. Finally the upper fleet, under Flag-Officer C. H. Davis, came down the Major-General C. L. Stevenson, C. S. A. From a photograph. river, joined the vessels that had run our batteries, put a flotilla of mortar-boats in position, and took part in the grand but nearly harmless sport of pitching big shells into Vicksburg. During this period General Thomas Williams commenced the famous canal across the narrow neck of land in front of Vicksburg. But the water fell faster than the ditch was dug, the river refused to make a cut-off, and thi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
quadron during this period were, first, Charles Henry Davis, and later, David D. Porter, the transfe 6th of June, by the combined forces of Flag-Officer Davis and Colonel Ellet [see Vol. I., pp. 449harles Ellet, Jr., had created.--Edttors. Davis arrived above Vicksburg on the 1st of July, anlowed him at her usual snail's pace, to borrow Davis's phrase, without overtaking him. In a few min-past 3 they were engaged with the batteries. Davis, in the river above, also stationed three of h down the river with Williams and his troops. Davis had expected Farragut's departure, but he had gained by staying longer in the neighborhood. Davis accordingly withdrew to Helena, and for the ne the impression. As early as the 27th of June Davis had urgently recommended this step, and his re invaluable service. On the 15th of October Davis was relieved of this command, having been appoch was now the headquarters. He received from Davis intact the squadron as it had come from Foote [7 more...]
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), First expeditions of the Federal Navy (search)
brave determination which ever characterized that arm of the service throughout the four years of war. James Harman Ward many European countries believed that it would be, some naval base must be established and held permanently south of Hampton Roads, and even below Cape Hatteras, if possible. This was the report of the board of officers that had been commissioned to draw plans for the furtherance of the blockade, and whose members consisted of Captain Samuel F. Du Pont and Captain Charles H. Davis, of the navy; Alexander D. Bache, of the coast survey, and Major John G. Barnard, of the army. From their report, the Navy Department had organized and fitted out a squadron under the command of Flag-Officer Silas H. Stringham, which sailed under sealed orders on the 26th of August, 1861. It was composed of the Minnesota (flagship) under command of Captain G. J. Van Brunt; the Wabash, under command of Captain Samuel Mercer; the Monticello, the Susquehanna, the Pawnee, the Harrie
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
, if the blockade were to be made effective, the Federal Government must repossess itself as quickly as possible of the forts guarding the entrances to the important harbors of the South. From the Rio Grande to the Chesapeake the coast defenses were in the hands of the Confederacy. It was impossible for the navy to prevent the ingress and egress of blockade-runners under friendly guns. President Lincoln, in June, 1861, convened a board including Captain Samuel Francis Du Pont and Captain Charles H. Davis, of the navy, Major John G. Barnard, of the army, and Professor Alexander D. Bache, of the coast survey. After careful study they presented a plan to the President. Its first object was to obtain possession of Hatteras Inlet and thus close the main entrance to Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, which were veritable havens of refuge to the blockade-runner. This was to be followed up by the capture of Port Royal for a naval base, where vessels could be coaled and repaired without the ne
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
soon after the original seven ironclads ordered by the army. Though her engines were slow, she proved to be the most powerful fighting vessel in the Federal Mississippi squadron. She held that distinction till late in 1864, when the river monitors began to appear. The Benton was Foote's flagship in the operations around Island No.10; and when the gallant old officer retired, it was on her deck that he bade good-bye to his officers and men. The Benton then became the flagship of Captain Charles Henry Davis, who in her directed the famous battle off Memphis where the Ellet rams proved their prowess. The first commander of the Benton was Lieutenant S. Ledyard Phelps. He fought the gunboat in both of the above engagements. The Benton was hit twenty-five times while supporting Sherman's unsuccessful assault on Vicksburg from the north, and she was Admiral Porter's flagship when he ran by the batteries at the beginning of the maneuver by which Grant approached and invested Vicksburg f
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